Topics

Use of codes


Lauraine Syrnick
 

Definitely agree with Lindsay. Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means. Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada


Ray Rob
 

Yes , to me  ROC  means  Republic of China !


On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 12:46 PM Lauraine Syrnick <lauraine.syrnick@...> wrote:
Definitely agree with Lindsay.  Such codes are not good for all of us.  Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means.  Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada




Edie Mc
 

HI,
I actually found the list of codes to be handy. I printed them all out and used one this morning when I posted about the whereabouts of any old Cathcart Farmsc1850's in Renfrewshire. RFW. It shorted the subject heading for me. To each his own I guess.

Edie McArthur

------ Original Message ------
From: "Lauraine Syrnick" <lauraine.syrnick@...>
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 4 Feb, 2020 At 6:40 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Definitely agree with Lindsay. Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means. Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada








--
eamca57


Anne Burgess
 

I absolutely disagree. You soon learn the ones you use regularly. I almost never need to look up a UK code. And it's a lot less pain to look up an occasional code than to type out 'Ross and Cromarty' (17 keystrokes) or 'Montgomeryshire' (16) instead of 'ROC' or 'MGY' (just 3 each). That's why they were invented - to save typing.

Anne


Jocelyn Gould
 

Hello Lauraine - thanks for your comment. To answer your question - ROC is the code for Ross and Cromarty, as I stated in my initial suggestion, just to use an example.  Some more examples - INV = Inverness, BAN = Banff, MOR = Moray etc.  They're fairly self explanatory really.  By the way, they are available in many other locations and a printed page comes in handy.

How about if those who are used to using them, continue to do so and those not familiar, not use them, then the reader can decide whether to read the post or not.

Jocelyn

On 5/02/2020 7:27 pm, Edie McArthur wrote:
HI,
I actually found the list of codes to be handy.  I printed them all out and used one this morning  when I posted about the whereabouts of any old Cathcart Farmsc1850's in Renfrewshire. RFW.  It shorted the subject heading for me.  To each his own I guess.

Edie McArthur

------ Original Message ------
From: "Lauraine Syrnick" <lauraine.syrnick@...>
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 4 Feb, 2020 At 6:40 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Definitely agree with Lindsay.  Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means.  Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada








Lauraine Syrnick
 

Yes, realized they were abbreviation
and I use SHI sometimes. However, also belong to WIkiTree and you have to write the full contents of places so people from all over the world can readily understand0 what place you are talking about. For those living in Scotland, these may be a
benefit but for the many people living in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States do not see this as being viable. I have so much paper on my desk, another piece will not help and would never find it. Must try and find out which abbreviation is for Angus or Forforeshire.
Lauraine Syrnick

On Feb 5, 2020, at 8:06 PM, Jocelyn Gould <@jocelyngould> wrote:

Hello Lauraine - thanks for your comment. To answer your question - ROC is the code for Ross and Cromarty, as I stated in my initial suggestion, just to use an example. Some more examples - INV = Inverness, BAN = Banff, MOR = Moray etc. They're fairly self explanatory really. By the way, they are available in many other locations and a printed page comes in handy.

How about if those who are used to using them, continue to do so and those not familiar, not use them, then the reader can decide whether to read the post or not.

Jocelyn

On 5/02/2020 7:27 pm, Edie McArthur wrote:
HI,
I actually found the list of codes to be handy. I printed them all out and used one this morning when I posted about the whereabouts of any old Cathcart Farmsc1850's in Renfrewshire. RFW. It shorted the subject heading for me. To each his own I guess.

Edie McArthur

------ Original Message ------
From: "Lauraine Syrnick" <lauraine.syrnick@...>
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 4 Feb, 2020 At 6:40 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Definitely agree with Lindsay. Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means. Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada









Ian & Margaret Kelly
 

I think that WikiTree and Lauraine have the right idea. Why not take an extra few seconds and type the full word instead of using the codes. Not everyone lives in Scotland.

Ian, Qld. (oops, better make that Queensland)

-----Original Message-----
From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lauraine Syrnick
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2020 12:47 PM
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Yes, realized they were abbreviation
and I use SHI sometimes. However, also belong to WIkiTree and you have to write the full contents of places so people from all over the world can readily understand0 what place you are talking about. For those living in Scotland, these may be a benefit but for the many people living in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States do not see this as being viable. I have so much paper on my desk, another piece will not help and would never find it. Must try and find out which abbreviation is for Angus or Forforeshire.
Lauraine Syrnick
On Feb 5, 2020, at 8:06 PM, Jocelyn Gould <@jocelyngould> wrote:

Hello Lauraine - thanks for your comment. To answer your question - ROC is the code for Ross and Cromarty, as I stated in my initial suggestion, just to use an example. Some more examples - INV = Inverness, BAN = Banff, MOR = Moray etc. They're fairly self explanatory really. By the way, they are available in many other locations and a printed page comes in handy.

How about if those who are used to using them, continue to do so and those not familiar, not use them, then the reader can decide whether to read the post or not.

Jocelyn

On 5/02/2020 7:27 pm, Edie McArthur wrote:
HI,
I actually found the list of codes to be handy. I printed them all out and used one this morning when I posted about the whereabouts of any old Cathcart Farmsc1850's in Renfrewshire. RFW. It shorted the subject heading for me. To each his own I guess.

Edie McArthur

------ Original Message ------
From: "Lauraine Syrnick" <lauraine.syrnick@...>
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 4 Feb, 2020 At 6:40 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Definitely agree with Lindsay. Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means. Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada









Lindsay Graham
 

With what are you disagreeing, Anne?  The issue is not whether individuals wish to make use of Chapman codes in their own research (as you and many others do, but many do not) but whether Chapman codes should be compulsory in the headings of emails to this list.  If they are, that forces every reader to become familiar with Chapman codes, an impossible and quite inappropriate requirement.  It would also mean that some emails quoting Chapman codes would simply be ignored by some readers who are not familiar with them.  That would be a great pity.

Realistically, how much extra time does it take one to spell the word out in a single email heading rather than using a 3-letter code that many readers will not recognise?

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia


On 6/2/20 0956, Anne Burgess via Groups.Io wrote:
I absolutely disagree. You soon learn the ones you use regularly. I almost never need to look up a UK code. And it's a lot less pain to look up an occasional code than to type out 'Ross and Cromarty' (17 keystrokes) or 'Montgomeryshire' (16) instead of 'ROC' or 'MGY' (just 3 each).  That's why they were invented - to save typing.

Anne






Dee Byster-Graham
 

Dear fellow-listers,

 

Oh my goodness! All this talk of codes!

Just to be clear, I, for one, will never bother to use them, however ,people who wish to do so, may.

They serve no purpose, as far as I can see, except to add a layer of difficulty for new researchers, folks who have never heard of them, and for those delightful, shy folks who need to ask questions but don’t know how to easily.

Researching one’s family tree can be extremely difficult for anyone, especially when first beginning – I vividly recall my own tentative questions, and trying not to appear too silly in their wording.

Let us retain  a welcoming, helpful attitude, and not make difficulties where none need be for our new seekers.

 

Kindly,

Dee.

Searching: MITCHELL: MATHER: MORE: COB: BANNISTER:BULLOCH, and related families.

 

 

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io [mailto:Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lindsay Graham
Sent: Thursday, 6 February 2020 4:27 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Use of codes

 

With what are you disagreeing, Anne?  The issue is not whether individuals wish to make use of Chapman codes in their own research (as you and many others do, but many do not) but whether Chapman codes should be compulsory in the headings of emails to this list.  If they are, that forces every reader to become familiar with Chapman codes, an impossible and quite inappropriate requirement.  It would also mean that some emails quoting Chapman codes would simply be ignored by some readers who are not familiar with them.  That would be a great pity.

Realistically, how much extra time does it take one to spell the word out in a single email heading rather than using a 3-letter code that many readers will not recognise?

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia

(snip)

 
 
 
 

 


Allan Moore
 

Having been in the Airline industry for 43 years I find it easy and intuitive. That being said, while I know the codes I use on a daily basis and the main global major airport codes, I have little knowledge of the codes out of my “circle of influence”.

On Feb 5, 2020, at 15:56, Anne Burgess via Groups.Io <anne.genlists=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

I absolutely disagree. You soon learn the ones you use regularly. I almost never need to look up a UK code. And it's a lot less pain to look up an occasional code than to type out 'Ross and Cromarty' (17 keystrokes) or 'Montgomeryshire' (16) instead of 'ROC' or 'MGY' (just 3 each). That's why they were invented - to save typing.

Anne



Carolyn Perkes <cperkes@...>
 

For what it's worth, in Canada, "le ROC" means the rest of Canada (outside Quebec).

But in the Chapman code, ROC, in Scotland, is Ross and Cromarty.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapman_code

***
Carolyn

(live in Quebec (QC), born in Ontario (ON), Canada, with Scottish ancestors in Lanarkshire (LKS), Sutherland (SUT) and Caithness (CAI).

Cheer up, life's about learning. :-)




On 04/02/20 19:15, Ray Rob <rayrobt@...> wrote:
Yes , to me  ROC  means  Republic of China !

On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 12:46 PM Lauraine Syrnick <lauraine.syrnick@...> wrote:
Definitely agree with Lindsay.  Such codes are not good for all of us.  Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means.  Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada




Ian & Margaret Kelly
 

Perhaps the people who are too busy to type out the full word could put  the link to the codes in their message so others would not have to spend half an hour trying to find out what the codes mean.  If we eventually get to use codes for places all over the world then, as Lindsay says, many people would just delete the message without reading it..

 

Ian, Queensland.

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lindsay Graham
Sent: Thursday, February 6, 2020 4:27 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Use of codes

 

With what are you disagreeing, Anne?  The issue is not whether individuals wish to make use of Chapman codes in their own research (as you and many others do, but many do not) but whether Chapman codes should be compulsory in the headings of emails to this list.  If they are, that forces every reader to become familiar with Chapman codes, an impossible and quite inappropriate requirement.  It would also mean that some emails quoting Chapman codes would simply be ignored by some readers who are not familiar with them.  That would be a great pity.

Realistically, how much extra time does it take one to spell the word out in a single email heading rather than using a 3-letter code that many readers will not recognise?

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia


On 6/2/20 0956, Anne Burgess via Groups.Io wrote:

I absolutely disagree. You soon learn the ones you use regularly. I almost never need to look up a UK code. And it's a lot less pain to look up an occasional code than to type out 'Ross and Cromarty' (17 keystrokes) or 'Montgomeryshire' (16) instead of 'ROC' or 'MGY' (just 3 each).  That's why they were invented - to save typing.
 
Anne
 
 


Anne Burgess
 

Angus is ANS and it was Forfarshire not Forforeshire.

Anne

-----Original Message-----
From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io [mailto:Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lauraine Syrnick
Sent: 06 February 2020 02:47
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Yes, realized they were abbreviation
and I use SHI sometimes. However, also belong to WIkiTree and you have to write the full contents of places so people from all over the world can readily understand0 what place you are talking about. For those living in Scotland, these may be a benefit but for the many people living in South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States do not see this as being viable. I have so much paper on my desk, another piece will not help and would never find it. Must try and find out which abbreviation is for Angus or Forforeshire.
Lauraine Syrnick
On Feb 5, 2020, at 8:06 PM, Jocelyn Gould <@jocelyngould> wrote:

Hello Lauraine - thanks for your comment. To answer your question - ROC is the code for Ross and Cromarty, as I stated in my initial suggestion, just to use an example. Some more examples - INV = Inverness, BAN = Banff, MOR = Moray etc. They're fairly self explanatory really. By the way, they are available in many other locations and a printed page comes in handy.

How about if those who are used to using them, continue to do so and those not familiar, not use them, then the reader can decide whether to read the post or not.

Jocelyn

On 5/02/2020 7:27 pm, Edie McArthur wrote:
HI,
I actually found the list of codes to be handy. I printed them all out and used one this morning when I posted about the whereabouts of any old Cathcart Farmsc1850's in Renfrewshire. RFW. It shorted the subject heading for me. To each his own I guess.

Edie McArthur

------ Original Message ------
From: "Lauraine Syrnick" <lauraine.syrnick@...>
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 4 Feb, 2020 At 6:40 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Use of codes

Definitely agree with Lindsay. Such codes are not good for all of us. Yes, maybe we should use them, but have no idea what’s ROC means. Will have to look it up which is a real pain.
Lauraine (Smith) Syrnick - Canada









Anne Burgess
 

I have 50,000+individuals in my tree. For every single one the county/state/country/province etc is abbreviated using Chapman codes. Assuming that the average full name is 9 letters, that's one-third of the typing, 50,000+ times. That's a lot of typing, and a lot of time, and a lot of damage to my arthritic fingers avoided.

I don't mind whether they are compulsory or not, but I have used the full county name in the titles of my two Scottish lists.

Anne

-----Original Message-----
From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io [mailto:Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io] On Behalf Of Lindsay Graham
Sent: 06 February 2020 06:27
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Use of codes

With what are you disagreeing, Anne? The issue is not whether individuals wish to make use of Chapman codes in their own research (as you and many others do, but many do not) but whether Chapman codes should be compulsory in the headings of emails to this list. If they are, that forces every reader to become familiar with Chapman codes, an impossible and quite inappropriate requirement. It would also mean that some emails quoting Chapman codes would simply be ignored by some readers who are not familiar with them. That would be a great pity.

Realistically, how much extra time does it take one to spell the word out in a single email heading rather than using a 3-letter code that many readers will not recognise?

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia



On 6/2/20 0956, Anne Burgess via Groups.Io wrote:


I absolutely disagree. You soon learn the ones you use regularly. I almost never need to look up a UK code. And it's a lot less pain to look up an occasional code than to type out 'Ross and Cromarty' (17 keystrokes) or 'Montgomeryshire' (16) instead of 'ROC' or 'MGY' (just 3 each). That's why they were invented - to save typing.

Anne


Janet Miller
 

To code or not to code indeed

Well said Lindsay, Now back to the drawing board.
Cheers
Janet in New Zealand