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More ROC SCT


Jocelyn Gould
 

But Lindsay, you don't have a different view to me at all as I hope my new subject line will show.  I agree entirely and what you say is exactly what I am suggesting and now putting into practice, and if your Mores aren't from ROC, you won't waste time even looking at this and that is the point, unless you're following my thread. 

The Chapman Codes were designed for a good reason and surely all researchers are interested in improving their research skills.

My great grandmother was Catherine MORE b 29 Jul 1833 at Arkendeith near Avoch ROC (in the Black Isle which is neither an island nor black) to father Alexander MORE (1774-1860) and his second wife Catharine MUSTARD (1787-1867).  His first wife was Isabel MORE (maiden name) and they had seven children all born in the Black Isle in ROC between 1799 and 1812. 

Looking for descendants from either wife.

And if my suggestion works, Lindsay, you won't even read this ;-)

Jocelyn in Queensland

On 3/02/2020 5:28 pm, Lindsay Graham wrote:
Although a fellow Australian, I'm afraid I have a different view, Jocelyn.

First, it is really important that subject headings are relevant to the content of the message.  That's why I changed the heading above -- and also made it a new topic so that it is not included in the same conversation as all those about MORE.  How much easier it will be for each of us when looking over pst emails and, particularly, the archives of this list, if subject headings relate to the content.

Second, I agree that Chapman codes can be useful, but not everyone knows about them.  This list should be useful for both new and experienced researchers -- it will be most helpful for newbies if the words used are easily understood without having to do a lookup somewhere else.

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia



Lindsay Graham
 

Jocelyn, you have changed the existing subject line, which means that (because email programs look at headers not subject lines) it will be included in the same conversation thread as the email to which you have replied.  Always best to use a new email for a new subject.

I suggested that Chapman codes can be useful, but not in subject headings in this list.  I have no idea what ROC means and you have not even interpreted it in the body of the email.  Sure, I could go and look it up, but why would not use a term that everybody, including new users who are feeling their way and looking for help, will understand?

Lindsay


On 4/2/20 1651, Jocelyn Gould wrote:

But Lindsay, you don't have a different view to me at all as I hope my new subject line will show.  I agree entirely and what you say is exactly what I am suggesting and now putting into practice, and if your Mores aren't from ROC, you won't waste time even looking at this and that is the point, unless you're following my thread. 

The Chapman Codes were designed for a good reason and surely all researchers are interested in improving their research skills.

My great grandmother was Catherine MORE b 29 Jul 1833 at Arkendeith near Avoch ROC (in the Black Isle which is neither an island nor black) to father Alexander MORE (1774-1860) and his second wife Catharine MUSTARD (1787-1867).  His first wife was Isabel MORE (maiden name) and they had seven children all born in the Black Isle in ROC between 1799 and 1812. 

Looking for descendants from either wife.

And if my suggestion works, Lindsay, you won't even read this ;-)

Jocelyn in Queensland

On 3/02/2020 5:28 pm, Lindsay Graham wrote:
Although a fellow Australian, I'm afraid I have a different view, Jocelyn.

First, it is really important that subject headings are relevant to the content of the message.  That's why I changed the heading above -- and also made it a new topic so that it is not included in the same conversation as all those about MORE.  How much easier it will be for each of us when looking over pst emails and, particularly, the archives of this list, if subject headings relate to the content.

Second, I agree that Chapman codes can be useful, but not everyone knows about them.  This list should be useful for both new and experienced researchers -- it will be most helpful for newbies if the words used are easily understood without having to do a lookup somewhere else.

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia