Ancestry tree errors


Marian Meldrum
 

Without wishing to harp on too much, I contacted someone who had my grt grandmother living in New Zealand - when I told them she had never left UK and had died in Glasgow- the response was “well she must have been related to mine” and blocked me.

But the most annoying one is my family from Kirkcudbrightshire - going back to late 1700’s - a ploughman, and according to Census, his spouse a widow and a washerwoman - living with one of her three sons.  However several trees have him dying in Georgia USA and a slave owner.   The slave owner, same name, same area, according to his will which is on line in USA records, left his property to his “woman”, and money to his niece and brother.   Looking at the wider picture, I strongly suspect if they were one and the same person, he would have had his three sons with him in USA, and highly unlikely that he would have gone from a ploughman to a plantation owner within a few years and if he had deserted the family when the sons were very young, it is unlikely that he would have had grandchildren in Scotland named after hiim.

Another one is a burial in a Commonwealth War Grave on findagrave …. Several USA residents have “claimed” their relative - and added a USA spouse.  He was married in England, his English wife named on “soldiers effects” but someone a very similar name born in Ireland is on passenger list going to Canada and USA - and did marry an American women - have told them they have the wrong “granpappy” and regretfully the “memorial owner” has not removed these incorrect “tributes”

I am sure we all have seen this which really highlights the difference between “tree building” and “family history”

Regards

Marian

On Wednesday, 3 November 2021, 22:43:37 GMT, Ken Harrison <kenharrison43@...> wrote:


Yes.  I don’t use Ancestry but I’ve found similar problems on trees in Family Search.  Without going into too much detail, these include persons marrying and having children at an age of 200 or more, or marrying and having more children decades after their own deaths, or …

Where it has affected my own direct ancestry, I have put in a “Discussion” to detail the facts from the parish register and asking for further contact, after unsuccessfully trying to contact the person directly first.  None of them have ever added to the discussion, none have replied to me, but several times I have found a few months later that the gibberish has been put back.

Ken

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of marthaedmond marthaedmond
Sent: November 3, 2021 11:44 AM
To: Anne Burgess via groups.io <anne.genlists@...>; scots <scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] I am researching my great great great gandfather Daniel Mc Alpin. I know he was born in Islay in 1752 and moved to the states. He married Catherine Isabella Mumm. Where can I find archives or possible information on this parents. Thanks, Bev

 

Thank you, Anne, for being such a strong advocate for the current situation on Ancestry. As an historian I often use Ancestry but I am always wary. You have provided many examples yourself. To point out the absurdities that occur on family trees, I take the example of the tree of a well-known artist in Canada, Tom Thomson. Much is known about his family so we have a good factual starting point. But if you look at one tree, for example, we have a number of very curious stories based on "borrowed" family trees. For example, his poor sister Margaret seemingly managed to move around a lot as a baby! She is noted as being born in Kinross Scotland in 1890 but the same year she is also living in Saint John, N.B.  In 1891, a year later, she is now in Grey County (Leith) but is also living back in Kinross. By 1901, she is living in both Leith and Kinross. In 1910, she arrives in Halifax. (Margaret was actually born in Leith Sydenham, Ontario and remained there throughout her childhood never venturing to Halifax, certainly not Scotland). In 1979 she dies – but then departs for Glasgow, Scotland.

Further indignities have her married to Mr. Twaddle (later Tweedale, her actual husband) but, because she has somehow acquired her brother-in-law's last name, she has become Margaret Harkness and is now married to him as well. And, her photo is used in place of that of her mother.  

And her poor father, John -- we find him re-marrying his deceased wife, a year after her death. He did remarry but to his wife's sister (same last name), much more alive I suspect. Her brother, George, curiously is listed both in Seattle (actual) but also at Rama, a First Nations community on the Chippewas of Rama First Nation reserve in Ontario. And her mother, sad to say, died in 1925 but twenty years later, according to the tree, is evidently still going strong and residing, at the same time, in both Owen Sound and Pickering, Ont.  

These are just a few of the countless examples of "cross-contamination" that exist. Future researchers will have a very hard time unravelling this mess. 

Martha Edmond

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Anne Burgess via groups.io" <anne.genlists@...>
Date: November 3, 2021 at 5:55 AM


Yes.Carefully hidden on a page where you have to scroll down to see it. Just enough for them to be able to say, "There is a warning" when someone takes the trouble to complain.

But if you are a newbie and you come across a tree using a search engine, you don't see that warning. There should be a garishly coloured waving banner at the top of every pages of every tree warning people not to trust submitted trees.

Don't get me wrong. There is a lot of useful information on Ancestry. But there is also a vast amount of information that is just plain wrong, and very little effort is made to warn users about it.

Anne



Ian & Margaret Kelly
 

Yeah Marian (and others) many of us have probably experienced the ‘copiers’ on Ancestry.  I don’t know what you can do about them if they are not interested in fixing up their errors.. And Ancestry probably are not too concerned as long as we keep signing up for a subscription.

 

Cheers,

Ian, Qld

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marian Meldrum via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 4 November 2021 10:56 AM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Without wishing to harp on too much, I contacted someone who had my grt grandmother living in New Zealand - when I told them she had never left UK and had died in Glasgow- the response was “well she must have been related to mine” and blocked me.

 

But the most annoying one is my family from Kirkcudbrightshire - going back to late 1700’s - a ploughman, and according to Census, his spouse a widow and a washerwoman - living with one of her three sons.  However several trees have him dying in Georgia USA and a slave owner.   The slave owner, same name, same area, according to his will which is on line in USA records, left his property to his “woman”, and money to his niece and brother.   Looking at the wider picture, I strongly suspect if they were one and the same person, he would have had his three sons with him in USA, and highly unlikely that he would have gone from a ploughman to a plantation owner within a few years and if he had deserted the family when the sons were very young, it is unlikely that he would have had grandchildren in Scotland named after hiim.

 

Another one is a burial in a Commonwealth War Grave on findagrave …. Several USA residents have “claimed” their relative - and added a USA spouse.  He was married in England, his English wife named on “soldiers effects” but someone a very similar name born in Ireland is on passenger list going to Canada and USA - and did marry an American women - have told them they have the wrong “granpappy” and regretfully the “memorial owner” has not removed these incorrect “tributes”

 

I am sure we all have seen this which really highlights the difference between “tree building” and “family history”

 

Regards

 

Marian

 


 

My answer to the problems is to do the best genealogy work possible, using all the tools and records possible, including DNA. And then make sure that it's everywhere; including the FamilySearch Family Tree, Wikitree, Geni, Geneanet. And write up proof arguments for difficult cases and make them easy to find. 

Good information will drive out bad, and will stand the test of time. 

Ancestry didn't invent bad trees, or copying. Look at many of the published genealogies written 100 years ago! Riddled with errors, unsourced -- and widely copied. We have our work cut out for us!

Valorie

On Wed, Nov 3, 2021 at 9:02 PM Ian & Margaret Kelly <imkelly21@...> wrote:

Yeah Marian (and others) many of us have probably experienced the ‘copiers’ on Ancestry.  I don’t know what you can do about them if they are not interested in fixing up their errors.. And Ancestry probably are not too concerned as long as we keep signing up for a subscription.

 

Cheers,

Ian, Qld


::snip old:: 

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Beverly Walker
 

Just to weigh in...and I live in the US,,,, even among family members people can be stubborn about changing their notions about their own heritage.  I have a group of cousins who have relied on "Bible records" to prove


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian & Margaret Kelly <imkelly21@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Nov 4, 2021 12:02 am
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Yeah Marian (and others) many of us have probably experienced the ‘copiers’ on Ancestry.  I don’t know what you can do about them if they are not interested in fixing up their errors.. And Ancestry probably are not too concerned as long as we keep signing up for a subscription.
 
Cheers,
Ian, Qld
 
From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marian Meldrum via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 4 November 2021 10:56 AM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors
 
Without wishing to harp on too much, I contacted someone who had my grt grandmother living in New Zealand - when I told them she had never left UK and had died in Glasgow- the response was “well she must have been related to mine” and blocked me.
 
But the most annoying one is my family from Kirkcudbrightshire - going back to late 1700’s - a ploughman, and according to Census, his spouse a widow and a washerwoman - living with one of her three sons.  However several trees have him dying in Georgia USA and a slave owner.   The slave owner, same name, same area, according to his will which is on line in USA records, left his property to his “woman”, and money to his niece and brother.   Looking at the wider picture, I strongly suspect if they were one and the same person, he would have had his three sons with him in USA, and highly unlikely that he would have gone from a ploughman to a plantation owner within a few years and if he had deserted the family when the sons were very young, it is unlikely that he would have had grandchildren in Scotland named after hiim.
 
Another one is a burial in a Commonwealth War Grave on findagrave …. Several USA residents have “claimed” their relative - and added a USA spouse.  He was married in England, his English wife named on “soldiers effects” but someone a very similar name born in Ireland is on passenger list going to Canada and USA - and did marry an American women - have told them they have the wrong “granpappy” and regretfully the “memorial owner” has not removed these incorrect “tributes”
 
I am sure we all have seen this which really highlights the difference between “tree building” and “family history”
 
Regards
 
Marian
 


Beverly Walker
 

Forgive me...my tablet sent half a message.  I started to say that I have a group of cousins who have relied on one family member's Bible records recorded around the turn of the 20th century.  Names and relationships are correct but dates and places of death are absolutely wrong.  There are clear records that prove this.  Still several cousins have recorded the incorrect information in their trees.  I have contacted them with proofs and I get a message that is usually polite but makes clear that there is no interest in making the necessary corrections to their trees.

I have also researched and become attached to lines that are not mine. It is a struggle to give up going down a rabbit hole if even when there is enough evidence not to continue.  You have to develop a commitment to change your tree if some new significant information comes your way. I think some tire of research and just want to move on.  

Beverly W



-----Original Message-----
From: Marian Meldrum via groups.io <marian.meldrum@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Nov 3, 2021 8:55 pm
Subject: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Without wishing to harp on too much, I contacted someone who had my grt grandmother living in New Zealand - when I told them she had never left UK and had died in Glasgow- the response was “well she must have been related to mine” and blocked me.

But the most annoying one is my family from Kirkcudbrightshire - going back to late 1700’s - a ploughman, and according to Census, his spouse a widow and a washerwoman - living with one of her three sons.  However several trees have him dying in Georgia USA and a slave owner.   The slave owner, same name, same area, according to his will which is on line in USA records, left his property to his “woman”, and money to his niece and brother.   Looking at the wider picture, I strongly suspect if they were one and the same person, he would have had his three sons with him in USA, and highly unlikely that he would have gone from a ploughman to a plantation owner within a few years and if he had deserted the family when the sons were very young, it is unlikely that he would have had grandchildren in Scotland named after hiim.

Another one is a burial in a Commonwealth War Grave on findagrave …. Several USA residents have “claimed” their relative - and added a USA spouse.  He was married in England, his English wife named on “soldiers effects” but someone a very similar name born in Ireland is on passenger list going to Canada and USA - and did marry an American women - have told them they have the wrong “granpappy” and regretfully the “memorial owner” has not removed these incorrect “tributes”

I am sure we all have seen this which really highlights the difference between “tree building” and “family history”

Regards

Marian

On Wednesday, 3 November 2021, 22:43:37 GMT, Ken Harrison <kenharrison43@...> wrote:


Yes.  I don’t use Ancestry but I’ve found similar problems on trees in Family Search.  Without going into too much detail, these include persons marrying and having children at an age of 200 or more, or marrying and having more children decades after their own deaths, or …
Where it has affected my own direct ancestry, I have put in a “Discussion” to detail the facts from the parish register and asking for further contact, after unsuccessfully trying to contact the person directly first.  None of them have ever added to the discussion, none have replied to me, but several times I have found a few months later that the gibberish has been put back.
Ken
 
From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of marthaedmond marthaedmond
Sent: November 3, 2021 11:44 AM
To: Anne Burgess via groups.io <anne.genlists@...>; scots <scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] I am researching my great great great gandfather Daniel Mc Alpin. I know he was born in Islay in 1752 and moved to the states. He married Catherine Isabella Mumm. Where can I find archives or possible information on this parents. Thanks, Bev
 
Thank you, Anne, for being such a strong advocate for the current situation on Ancestry. As an historian I often use Ancestry but I am always wary. You have provided many examples yourself. To point out the absurdities that occur on family trees, I take the example of the tree of a well-known artist in Canada, Tom Thomson. Much is known about his family so we have a good factual starting point. But if you look at one tree, for example, we have a number of very curious stories based on "borrowed" family trees. For example, his poor sister Margaret seemingly managed to move around a lot as a baby! She is noted as being born in Kinross Scotland in 1890 but the same year she is also living in Saint John, N.B.  In 1891, a year later, she is now in Grey County (Leith) but is also living back in Kinross. By 1901, she is living in both Leith and Kinross. In 1910, she arrives in Halifax. (Margaret was actually born in Leith Sydenham, Ontario and remained there throughout her childhood never venturing to Halifax, certainly not Scotland). In 1979 she dies – but then departs for Glasgow, Scotland.
Further indignities have her married to Mr. Twaddle (later Tweedale, her actual husband) but, because she has somehow acquired her brother-in-law's last name, she has become Margaret Harkness and is now married to him as well. And, her photo is used in place of that of her mother.  
And her poor father, John -- we find him re-marrying his deceased wife, a year after her death. He did remarry but to his wife's sister (same last name), much more alive I suspect. Her brother, George, curiously is listed both in Seattle (actual) but also at Rama, a First Nations community on the Chippewas of Rama First Nation reserve in Ontario. And her mother, sad to say, died in 1925 but twenty years later, according to the tree, is evidently still going strong and residing, at the same time, in both Owen Sound and Pickering, Ont.  
These are just a few of the countless examples of "cross-contamination" that exist. Future researchers will have a very hard time unravelling this mess. 
Martha Edmond
---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Anne Burgess via groups.io" <anne.genlists@...>
Date: November 3, 2021 at 5:55 AM


Yes.Carefully hidden on a page where you have to scroll down to see it. Just enough for them to be able to say, "There is a warning" when someone takes the trouble to complain.

But if you are a newbie and you come across a tree using a search engine, you don't see that warning. There should be a garishly coloured waving banner at the top of every pages of every tree warning people not to trust submitted trees.

Don't get me wrong. There is a lot of useful information on Ancestry. But there is also a vast amount of information that is just plain wrong, and very little effort is made to warn users about it.

Anne



Angela Reed
 

Yes I think many of us have had that problem…. I did with someone in Australia putting one of my ancestors with their family and even though I sent him Backup documentation he would not change it!
I take names etc with caution and try to get documentation… 
Angela


Bret Busby
 

On 4/11/21 3:24 pm, Valorie Zimmerman wrote:
My answer to the problems is to do the best genealogy work possible, using all the tools and records possible, including DNA. And then make sure that it's everywhere; including the FamilySearch Family Tree, Wikitree, Geni, Geneanet. And write up proof arguments for difficult cases and make them easy to find.
Good information will drive out bad, and will stand the test of time.
Ancestry didn't invent bad trees, or copying. Look at many of the published genealogies written 100 years ago! Riddled with errors, unsourced -- and widely copied. We have our work cut out for us!
Valorie
On Wed, Nov 3, 2021 at 9:02 PM Ian & Margaret Kelly <imkelly21@... <mailto:imkelly21@...>> wrote:
Yeah Marian (and others) many of us have probably experienced the
‘copiers’ on Ancestry.  I don’t know what you can do about them if
they are not interested in fixing up their errors.. And Ancestry
probably are not too concerned as long as we keep signing up for a
subscription.____
__ __
Cheers,____
Ian, Qld
I agree with Valorie - verification of data is necessary,for a person's own information's integrity, and, a useful resource, can be genealogical DNA testing.

In this particular instance, genealogical DNA testing can be useful in establishing what probability exists, of relationships between different lines with the same family name; for example, between males with the same family name, if a 100% match is not found at the 12 marker Y-DNA test level, then the lines are likely not related; a match at the 12 marker level, through familytreedna.com, is supposed to indicate a likely Most Recent Common Ancestor, within the last 29 generations, so, without a 100% match at that level, a relationship between males of the same family name, is unlikely.

For Y-DNA testing, I recommend the familytreedna.com 37 marker test, which also incorporates the 12 and 25 marker tests, and, a 100% match at the 37 marker level, for males with the same family name, is supposed to indicate a likely Most Recent Common Ancestor within the last 5 generations.

Apart from the Y-DNA testing, autosomal testing can be useful; through familytreedna.com, the test is the family Finder Test, which can otherwise find probable relationships.

And, as it happens, familytreedna.com currently have a discount sale offer, until 21 November (USA time) - see
https://www.familytreedna.com/products/family-finder
and
https://www.familytreedna.com/products/y-dna
(Family Finder test reduced to 59USD and Y37 test reduced to 79USD)

And, if you go to
https://www.familytreedna.com/group-project-search?sType=eq&search=scotland
I saw three different Scots geographical Group Projects (and, a Viking one, for people who may have Viking ancestry)

If a person decides to have genealogical DNA testing, I strongly recommend including autosomal testing; in the case of familytreedna.com, the Family Finder test.

Also, whilst wikitree has some tendencies to which I object (and, have objected), relationships and most claimed factual information, are subject to validation by source verification, etc.

wikitree is mostly useful, and, because of what it involves, it is far superior to other facilities, in that multiple versions of the same family tree, with some involving fallacies, are unlikely to be allowed to exist on wikitree.

And, wikitree is free.

I am disinclined to use any genealogical facility that requires payment, unless it is for an irrefutable service; with familytreedna.com, it is a service that is scientific analysis, with the provision of results that are valid; the probability of relationships through found matches; with buying copies of Birth, Marriage, and Death, records, those are (where what is provided, is a digitally scanned copy, rather than transcribed) the absolute records (although, they can be slightly erroneous, on occasion, where the person creating the original record, made an error), but, when a person pays to see what another person has created, such as ancestry.com, etc, family trees, then that is a case of the proverb - "You pays your money, you takes your chances" - like buying a lottery ticket.

--
Bret Busby
Genealogical DNA Research Participant and Campaigner
Armadale
West Australia
(UTC+0800)
..............


Les Horn
 

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les


aberloursearch@...
 

Hi List,

I have been watching this thread with great interest, I have been researching my tree every day for more than 20 years now.

In the beginning i bought every Birth Marriage and Death certificates that were available from my parents back as far as civil registration began.
I then began to look at census records and took all the relevant information from all of those available.
I also visited New Register House in Edinburgh looking at wills etc. I also viewed all the Poor law records and Parish records to get as much information as possible.

I do look at trees on Ancestry and other various sites as i believe that not everyone has rubbish in their trees.

I dont copy any of the trees but if they have someone on their tree that may be linked to my family i can then check the information they have and see if it is correct or not. If it is not correct then all i have wasted is a bit of my time but at least they may have pointed me in the right direction to finding someone i have been looking for on my tree.

Ray


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Horn <leshorn44@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 7:42
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les


Denise Reid
 

So VERY true – sadly !!!

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Les Horn
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 11:42 AM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les


orange.wasps
 

Avoiding Ancestry is self-defeating.  There are a great many resources that are valuable and unimpeachable, and even trees with errors can open a whole new line of enquiry.

 

Ruth

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io [mailto:Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io] On Behalf Of Denise Reid
Sent: 05 November 2021 02:56
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

So VERY true – sadly !!!

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Les Horn
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 11:42 AM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les


Ian & Margaret Kelly
 

I agree with you Ruth.  The Ancestry trees can solve a lot of mysteries as long as you understand there could be errors.

 

Ian,

Queensland.

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of orange.wasps
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 6:50 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Avoiding Ancestry is self-defeating.  There are a great many resources that are valuable and unimpeachable, and even trees with errors can open a whole new line of enquiry.

 

Ruth


Joseph Gillard
 

At the very best, they are rough starting points from which to prove the case from original records.

Joseph, NZ

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian & Margaret Kelly
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 11:24 pm
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

I agree with you Ruth.  The Ancestry trees can solve a lot of mysteries as long as you understand there could be errors.

 

Ian,

Queensland.

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of orange.wasps
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 6:50 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Avoiding Ancestry is self-defeating.  There are a great many resources that are valuable and unimpeachable, and even trees with errors can open a whole new line of enquiry.

 

Ruth


LorneandJudy
 

Hello,
About errors on Trees or someone taking pictures or family members for their Tree. Honestly, I look at this as an opportunity to find a new family member or helping them with their research. 
  I have always gotten back to someone about adding my family member to their tree and ask how they are related and how I can help further.
  A lot of the time, I think, it all depends on your correspondence with the other person. To date, after more than thirty years of doing family research I have only had one person that I just would not communicate with again.
  I had just started on my genealogical journey, not knowing anything about either side of my families or ancestors. All of my grandparents had passed away by the time I was seven years old, so I was starting from scratch.
   I would never have gotten anything done on my Family Trees without using Family Search or Ancestry mainly, but of course many other sites and sources. This fellow approached me telling me that my Tree looked like “ a dog’s breakfast” and to give him 24 hours to straighten it out. Needless to say, at that time I wasn’t aware of the correct format for date formation, names, Capital or Not, surnames, or to even being consistent with the format.
  I did of course look into that , and painstakingly changed everything so it was all the same. But, I did, learn something, and took it for what it was. Never the less, it was a good lesson in proper etiquette when approaching someone and on what NOT to say.
  I am more concerned about my trees being correct than others, if I can help someone straighten something out, I am quite happy to do that, and again, I never presume that my Tree is correct, unless of course I have documents to prove otherwise.
I always tell anyone that asks for help, happy to help, but also tell them that my Trees are always a “Work in Progress”. 
Cheers,
Judy Anderson nee Stables 
 Surrey, BC
  


On Nov 5, 2021, at 1:49 AM, orange.wasps <orange.wasps@...> wrote:



Avoiding Ancestry is self-defeating.  There are a great many resources that are valuable and unimpeachable, and even trees with errors can open a whole new line of enquiry.

 

Ruth

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io [mailto:Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io] On Behalf Of Denise Reid
Sent: 05 November 2021 02:56
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

So VERY true – sadly !!!

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Les Horn
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 11:42 AM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les


 

Thanks so much for your reply, Judy. I would hope every beginner encounters someone like you, rather than Mr. Dog's Breakfast! If we hope to take our genealogical knowledge forward, we must collaborate. 

Valorie

On Fri, Nov 5, 2021 at 5:29 AM LorneandJudy <lorneanderson@...> wrote:
Hello,
About errors on Trees or someone taking pictures or family members for their Tree. Honestly, I look at this as an opportunity to find a new family member or helping them with their research. 
  I have always gotten back to someone about adding my family member to their tree and ask how they are related and how I can help further.
  A lot of the time, I think, it all depends on your correspondence with the other person. To date, after more than thirty years of doing family research I have only had one person that I just would not communicate with again.
  I had just started on my genealogical journey, not knowing anything about either side of my families or ancestors. All of my grandparents had passed away by the time I was seven years old, so I was starting from scratch.
   I would never have gotten anything done on my Family Trees without using Family Search or Ancestry mainly, but of course many other sites and sources. This fellow approached me telling me that my Tree looked like “ a dog’s breakfast” and to give him 24 hours to straighten it out. Needless to say, at that time I wasn’t aware of the correct format for date formation, names, Capital or Not, surnames, or to even being consistent with the format.
  I did of course look into that , and painstakingly changed everything so it was all the same. But, I did, learn something, and took it for what it was. Never the less, it was a good lesson in proper etiquette when approaching someone and on what NOT to say.
  I am more concerned about my trees being correct than others, if I can help someone straighten something out, I am quite happy to do that, and again, I never presume that my Tree is correct, unless of course I have documents to prove otherwise.
I always tell anyone that asks for help, happy to help, but also tell them that my Trees are always a “Work in Progress”. 
Cheers,
Judy Anderson nee Stables 
 Surrey, BC
  


On Nov 5, 2021, at 1:49 AM, orange.wasps <orange.wasps@...> wrote:



Avoiding Ancestry is self-defeating.  There are a great many resources that are valuable and unimpeachable, and even trees with errors can open a whole new line of enquiry.

 

Ruth

::snip old:: 

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


Edie Mc
 

Hi Ray,

I have been researching over 36 years and doing it the same way as yourself. When many of us started Genealogy about 1980ish there was only the Genealogical Index Fiche available.  We were able to purchase certificates from Salt Lake City for 2 dollars, using the source, serial number and Bach number, we filled out special forms and sent them off to Salt Lake city.  I visited the complex in 1989 while on our way home after a ten week overseas holiday. .  I have lived in the UK in 1996 and 1998 and frequented many of the Record Office s for myself and others who live over in Australia, where I live. I used to share the expense of original Certificates back to the beginning of Civil Registration with a first cousin once removed who lived I the UK, as well, some of which of no use to me since finding my DNA family, though some of them are half family. None of the half family have surfaced in my DNA matches though.

 

It has only been  about three years since I started to use ancestry but in the same way as yourself. You have done it the right way. As you say not all trees are ridiculous, many are fine and have left blanks where they haven’t been sure of others work.  I leave blanks as well when nothing turns up that I need. At some stages a original record comes in a hint. Public trees though widely used are only a very small part of what ancestry has to offer. Many of which are under used.

 

I suppose you can teach by example, rather than getting annoyed (it doesn’t work) you can find the correct record, put the URL in the Web Link for them to find. Someone will correct and some will not. I do share the records as some can’t access  them if they do not have a paid subscription. At our Family History society,  we have a library edition members without their own paid account, use and they can print out from there. Most libraries have the same and patrons print out there as well.  The library edition isn’t the same though and they can only do so much with it.

Edie

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: aberloursearch via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 14:17
To: leshorn44@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hi List,

 

I have been watching this thread with great interest, I have been researching my tree every day for more than 20 years now.

 

In the beginning i bought every Birth Marriage and Death certificates that were available from my parents back as far as civil registration began.

I then began to look at census records and took all the relevant information from all of those available.

I also visited New Register House in Edinburgh looking at wills etc. I also viewed all the Poor law records and Parish records to get as much information as possible.

 

I do look at trees on Ancestry and other various sites as i believe that not everyone has rubbish in their trees.

 

I dont copy any of the trees but if they have someone on their tree that may be linked to my family i can then check the information they have and see if it is correct or not. If it is not correct then all i have wasted is a bit of my time but at least they may have pointed me in the right direction to finding someone i have been looking for on my tree.

 

Ray

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Horn <leshorn44@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 7:42
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les

 


--
EdieMc


aberloursearch@...
 

Hi Edie,

I have been trying to break down my 2 biggest brick walls for more than 20 years now. When my Great Great grandmother Anne Nelson died in Glasgow on 10 April 1890 Her Grandson who was a Solicitor so presumably was well educated gave Annes mother as a Jane Kumith deceased. I speculate that Jane was born sometime between 1780-1810 as Anne Nelson was born in Ireland approximately 1828 according to census and age of death on her death certificate.

I have searched almost every site i can think of and only one site has anyone at all with the surname Kumith and that is Ellis island web site where there are about 7 instances but all from the late 19th century-early 20th century and all were from Germany.

I know that Kumith is a German orientated surname so presume Jane also had German ancestors.

One day we may find out where she came from.

My other main brick wall is my 6 times Great grandfather who was Peter Fordyce born 22 April 1707 in the village of Fordyce in Banffshire, Scotland.

He was a foundling and was left outside the door of a man called Peter Morrison so was given the name Peter as a first name and given the surname Fordyce after the village name. I do know that all the ladies of child bearing age in the parish were examined to see if anyone of them had just given birth but no one was found.

Peter Fordyce went on to get married and have 9 children all born in a farm in Fordyce called Brackenhills, I have no idea how a foundling could have managed to own his own farm in those days without someone maybe family helping him financially. I have always thought that Peter Morrison whos house he was left outside was maybe his father as most foundlings at that time were left at the church. Peter Morrisons house was within 100 yards of the church.

It is always interesting to me to read about others brick walls and see if there is any way that i may be able to help.

Regards

Ray


-----Original Message-----
From: Edie Mc <eamca1944@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>; leshorn44@... <leshorn44@...>
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 13:39
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hi Ray,
I have been researching over 36 years and doing it the same way as yourself. When many of us started Genealogy about 1980ish there was only the Genealogical Index Fiche available.  We were able to purchase certificates from Salt Lake City for 2 dollars, using the source, serial number and Bach number, we filled out special forms and sent them off to Salt Lake city.  I visited the complex in 1989 while on our way home after a ten week overseas holiday. .  I have lived in the UK in 1996 and 1998 and frequented many of the Record Office s for myself and others who live over in Australia, where I live. I used to share the expense of original Certificates back to the beginning of Civil Registration with a first cousin once removed who lived I the UK, as well, some of which of no use to me since finding my DNA family, though some of them are half family. None of the half family have surfaced in my DNA matches though.
 
It has only been  about three years since I started to use ancestry but in the same way as yourself. You have done it the right way. As you say not all trees are ridiculous, many are fine and have left blanks where they haven’t been sure of others work.  I leave blanks as well when nothing turns up that I need. At some stages a original record comes in a hint. Public trees though widely used are only a very small part of what ancestry has to offer. Many of which are under used.
 
I suppose you can teach by example, rather than getting annoyed (it doesn’t work) you can find the correct record, put the URL in the Web Link for them to find. Someone will correct and some will not. I do share the records as some can’t access  them if they do not have a paid subscription. At our Family History society,  we have a library edition members without their own paid account, use and they can print out from there. Most libraries have the same and patrons print out there as well.  The library edition isn’t the same though and they can only do so much with it.
Edie
 
 
Sent from Mail for Windows
 
From: aberloursearch via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 14:17
To: leshorn44@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors
 
Hi List,
 
I have been watching this thread with great interest, I have been researching my tree every day for more than 20 years now.
 
In the beginning i bought every Birth Marriage and Death certificates that were available from my parents back as far as civil registration began.
I then began to look at census records and took all the relevant information from all of those available.
I also visited New Register House in Edinburgh looking at wills etc. I also viewed all the Poor law records and Parish records to get as much information as possible.
 
I do look at trees on Ancestry and other various sites as i believe that not everyone has rubbish in their trees.
 
I dont copy any of the trees but if they have someone on their tree that may be linked to my family i can then check the information they have and see if it is correct or not. If it is not correct then all i have wasted is a bit of my time but at least they may have pointed me in the right direction to finding someone i have been looking for on my tree.
 
Ray
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Les Horn <leshorn44@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 7:42
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors
Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les
 

--
EdieMc


Edie Mc
 

Maybe Peter was a Tenant farmer Ray and not actually owned it. If he did own it there could be land deeds that would give an idea where he maybe bought it or inherited it from.  The mother must have left the area. In England in those early  years you had to get a settlement certificate to move to another town, not sure if that was the same with Scotland. Anotherreasn for a DNA test.

 

It is interesting to hear of others brick walls though and how they were solved, you can usethe ideas yourself then

Edie

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: aberloursearch@...
Sent: Monday, 8 November 2021 17:01
To: eamca1944@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io; leshorn44@...
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hi Edie,

 

I have been trying to break down my 2 biggest brick walls for more than 20 years now. When my Great Great grandmother Anne Nelson died in Glasgow on 10 April 1890 Her Grandson who was a Solicitor so presumably was well educated gave Annes mother as a Jane Kumith deceased. I speculate that Jane was born sometime between 1780-1810 as Anne Nelson was born in Ireland approximately 1828 according to census and age of death on her death certificate.

 

I have searched almost every site i can think of and only one site has anyone at all with the surname Kumith and that is Ellis island web site where there are about 7 instances but all from the late 19th century-early 20th century and all were from Germany.

 

I know that Kumith is a German orientated surname so presume Jane also had German ancestors.

 

One day we may find out where she came from.

 

My other main brick wall is my 6 times Great grandfather who was Peter Fordyce born 22 April 1707 in the village of Fordyce in Banffshire, Scotland.

 

He was a foundling and was left outside the door of a man called Peter Morrison so was given the name Peter as a first name and given the surname Fordyce after the village name. I do know that all the ladies of child bearing age in the parish were examined to see if anyone of them had just given birth but no one was found.

 

Peter Fordyce went on to get married and have 9 children all born in a farm in Fordyce called Brackenhills, I have no idea how a foundling could have managed to own his own farm in those days without someone maybe family helping him financially. I have always thought that Peter Morrison whos house he was left outside was maybe his father as most foundlings at that time were left at the church. Peter Morrisons house was within 100 yards of the church.

 

It is always interesting to me to read about others brick walls and see if there is any way that i may be able to help.

 

Regards

 

Ray

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Edie Mc <eamca1944@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>; leshorn44@... <leshorn44@...>
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 13:39
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hi Ray,

I have been researching over 36 years and doing it the same way as yourself. When many of us started Genealogy about 1980ish there was only the Genealogical Index Fiche available.  We were able to purchase certificates from Salt Lake City for 2 dollars, using the source, serial number and Bach number, we filled out special forms and sent them off to Salt Lake city.  I visited the complex in 1989 while on our way home after a ten week overseas holiday. .  I have lived in the UK in 1996 and 1998 and frequented many of the Record Office s for myself and others who live over in Australia, where I live. I used to share the expense of original Certificates back to the beginning of Civil Registration with a first cousin once removed who lived I the UK, as well, some of which of no use to me since finding my DNA family, though some of them are half family. None of the half family have surfaced in my DNA matches though.

 

It has only been  about three years since I started to use ancestry but in the same way as yourself. You have done it the right way. As you say not all trees are ridiculous, many are fine and have left blanks where they haven’t been sure of others work.  I leave blanks as well when nothing turns up that I need. At some stages a original record comes in a hint. Public trees though widely used are only a very small part of what ancestry has to offer. Many of which are under used.

 

I suppose you can teach by example, rather than getting annoyed (it doesn’t work) you can find the correct record, put the URL in the Web Link for them to find. Someone will correct and some will not. I do share the records as some can’t access  them if they do not have a paid subscription. At our Family History society,  we have a library edition members without their own paid account, use and they can print out from there. Most libraries have the same and patrons print out there as well.  The library edition isn’t the same though and they can only do so much with it.

Edie

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: aberloursearch via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 14:17
To: leshorn44@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hi List,

 

I have been watching this thread with great interest, I have been researching my tree every day for more than 20 years now.

 

In the beginning i bought every Birth Marriage and Death certificates that were available from my parents back as far as civil registration began.

I then began to look at census records and took all the relevant information from all of those available.

I also visited New Register House in Edinburgh looking at wills etc. I also viewed all the Poor law records and Parish records to get as much information as possible.

 

I do look at trees on Ancestry and other various sites as i believe that not everyone has rubbish in their trees.

 

I dont copy any of the trees but if they have someone on their tree that may be linked to my family i can then check the information they have and see if it is correct or not. If it is not correct then all i have wasted is a bit of my time but at least they may have pointed me in the right direction to finding someone i have been looking for on my tree.

 

Ray

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Horn <leshorn44@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 7:42
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les

 


--
EdieMc

 


--
EdieMc


Edie Mc
 

Funny you should mention Bible Records as a primary source Beverley, as I said similar to someone who told me she had proof as it was in the family Bible and she had photographs of it. A good many Bibles are given or awarded years after all the Births that are inserted in it.  We have a family Bible and the first owner of it has clearly tried to change the date of the marriage, but realised there wasn’t any point as there are original records to prove the marriage date inserted was correct. The Bible  was awarded in 1898 and the last of nine children born in 1872.  The thing with Bibles the events entered in them can be entered many years after the event. That is not to say that most are written at the time of the event and are correct.

 

I also wished I had fifty dollars for every time I have said to anyone first starting out, that don’t forget to check the originals, after they have told me their relative, whom they trust keeps meticulous records. So they trust their work. I always tell people to check my information, because that is good genealogy practice and I am like anyone else, I may have made an error.

Edie

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Beverly Walker via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, 4 November 2021 22:18
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Forgive me...my tablet sent half a message.  I started to say that I have a group of cousins who have relied on one family member's Bible records recorded around the turn of the 20th century.  Names and relationships are correct but dates and places of death are absolutely wrong.  There are clear records that prove this.  Still several cousins have recorded the incorrect information in their trees.  I have contacted them with proofs and I get a message that is usually polite but makes clear that there is no interest in making the necessary corrections to their trees.

 

I have also researched and become attached to lines that are not mine. It is a struggle to give up going down a rabbit hole if even when there is enough evidence not to continue.  You have to develop a commitment to change your tree if some new significant information comes your way. I think some tire of research and just want to move on.  

 

Beverly W

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Marian Meldrum via groups.io <marian.meldrum@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Nov 3, 2021 8:55 pm
Subject: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Without wishing to harp on too much, I contacted someone who had my grt grandmother living in New Zealand - when I told them she had never left UK and had died in Glasgow- the response was “well she must have been related to mine” and blocked me.

 

But the most annoying one is my family from Kirkcudbrightshire - going back to late 1700’s - a ploughman, and according to Census, his spouse a widow and a washerwoman - living with one of her three sons.  However several trees have him dying in Georgia USA and a slave owner.   The slave owner, same name, same area, according to his will which is on line in USA records, left his property to his “woman”, and money to his niece and brother.   Looking at the wider picture, I strongly suspect if they were one and the same person, he would have had his three sons with him in USA, and highly unlikely that he would have gone from a ploughman to a plantation owner within a few years and if he had deserted the family when the sons were very young, it is unlikely that he would have had grandchildren in Scotland named after hiim.

 

Another one is a burial in a Commonwealth War Grave on findagrave …. Several USA residents have “claimed” their relative - and added a USA spouse.  He was married in England, his English wife named on “soldiers effects” but someone a very similar name born in Ireland is on passenger list going to Canada and USA - and did marry an American women - have told them they have the wrong “granpappy” and regretfully the “memorial owner” has not removed these incorrect “tributes”

 

I am sure we all have seen this which really highlights the difference between “tree building” and “family history”

 

Regards

 

Marian

 

On Wednesday, 3 November 2021, 22:43:37 GMT, Ken Harrison <kenharrison43@...> wrote:

 

 

Yes.  I don’t use Ancestry but I’ve found similar problems on trees in Family Search.  Without going into too much detail, these include persons marrying and having children at an age of 200 or more, or marrying and having more children decades after their own deaths, or …

Where it has affected my own direct ancestry, I have put in a “Discussion” to detail the facts from the parish register and asking for further contact, after unsuccessfully trying to contact the person directly first.  None of them have ever added to the discussion, none have replied to me, but several times I have found a few months later that the gibberish has been put back.

Ken

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of marthaedmond marthaedmond
Sent: November 3, 2021 11:44 AM
To: Anne Burgess via groups.io <anne.genlists@...>; scots <scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] I am researching my great great great gandfather Daniel Mc Alpin. I know he was born in Islay in 1752 and moved to the states. He married Catherine Isabella Mumm. Where can I find archives or possible information on this parents. Thanks, Bev

 

Thank you, Anne, for being such a strong advocate for the current situation on Ancestry. As an historian I often use Ancestry but I am always wary. You have provided many examples yourself. To point out the absurdities that occur on family trees, I take the example of the tree of a well-known artist in Canada, Tom Thomson. Much is known about his family so we have a good factual starting point. But if you look at one tree, for example, we have a number of very curious stories based on "borrowed" family trees. For example, his poor sister Margaret seemingly managed to move around a lot as a baby! She is noted as being born in Kinross Scotland in 1890 but the same year she is also living in Saint John, N.B.  In 1891, a year later, she is now in Grey County (Leith) but is also living back in Kinross. By 1901, she is living in both Leith and Kinross. In 1910, she arrives in Halifax. (Margaret was actually born in Leith Sydenham, Ontario and remained there throughout her childhood never venturing to Halifax, certainly not Scotland). In 1979 she dies – but then departs for Glasgow, Scotland.

Further indignities have her married to Mr. Twaddle (later Tweedale, her actual husband) but, because she has somehow acquired her brother-in-law's last name, she has become Margaret Harkness and is now married to him as well. And, her photo is used in place of that of her mother.  

And her poor father, John -- we find him re-marrying his deceased wife, a year after her death. He did remarry but to his wife's sister (same last name), much more alive I suspect. Her brother, George, curiously is listed both in Seattle (actual) but also at Rama, a First Nations community on the Chippewas of Rama First Nation reserve in Ontario. And her mother, sad to say, died in 1925 but twenty years later, according to the tree, is evidently still going strong and residing, at the same time, in both Owen Sound and Pickering, Ont.  

These are just a few of the countless examples of "cross-contamination" that exist. Future researchers will have a very hard time unravelling this mess. 

Martha Edmond

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Anne Burgess via groups.io" <anne.genlists@...>
Date: November 3, 2021 at 5:55 AM


Yes.Carefully hidden on a page where you have to scroll down to see it. Just enough for them to be able to say, "There is a warning" when someone takes the trouble to complain.

But if you are a newbie and you come across a tree using a search engine, you don't see that warning. There should be a garishly coloured waving banner at the top of every pages of every tree warning people not to trust submitted trees.

Don't get me wrong. There is a lot of useful information on Ancestry. But there is also a vast amount of information that is just plain wrong, and very little effort is made to warn users about it.

Anne

 


--
EdieMc


Edie Mc
 

HI  Ray,

I wonder if the institution who took your Foundling ancestor Peter Fordyce, ahs the records of him, from whenhe firt was left at Peter Morrisons home, you never said whether Peter Morrison kept him or he took him to a Foundling Institution in Scotland.  In England there was a famous ‘Thomas Coram Foundling Hospital’ from around 1745 or there abouts.  I know for a fact that mothers who left their children at that Institutions gate left some token, so if they were able to afford to get the child back they would know which token was given by  which mother, the token was pinned to the childs clothing with name.  There would be instances where no name, in the case of a rape and the mother had no interest in getting the child back, etc. .  It may have been half of something the mother kept or something belonging to her like  a brooch.  This were kept and labelled by name. Rarely did the mother come back, but that was the idea.  The name of the child was  given as well and changed like with your Peter, but the records are still available to this day.  So could be the case with your Peter. Could very well be like you say that Peter Morrison may have been his father and that is why the mother left him with Peter and he may have inherited the family farm. Sometimes DNA isn’t needed, you only have to look at two people sometime and the resemblance needs no other proof of relationship.

Edie

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: aberloursearch via groups.io
Sent: Monday, 8 November 2021 17:01
To: eamca1944@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io; leshorn44@...
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hi Edie,

 

 

My other main brick wall is my 6 times Great grandfather who was Peter Fordyce born 22 April 1707 in the village of Fordyce in Banffshire, Scotland.

 

He was a foundling and was left outside the door of a man called Peter Morrison so was given the name Peter as a first name and given the surname Fordyce after the village name. I do know that all the ladies of child bearing age in the parish were examined to see if anyone of them had just given birth but no one was found.

 

Peter Fordyce went on to get married and have 9 children all born in a farm in Fordyce called Brackenhills, I have no idea how a foundling could have managed to own his own farm in those days without someone maybe family helping him financially. I have always thought that Peter Morrison whos house he was left outside was maybe his father as most foundlings at that time were left at the church. Peter Morrisons house was within 100 yards of the church.

 

It is always interesting to me to read about others brick walls and see if there is any way that i may be able to help.

 

Regards

 

Ray

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Edie Mc <eamca1944@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>; leshorn44@... <leshorn44@...>
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 13:39
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hi Ray,

I have been researching over 36 years and doing it the same way as yourself. When many of us started Genealogy about 1980ish there was only the Genealogical Index Fiche available.  We were able to purchase certificates from Salt Lake City for 2 dollars, using the source, serial number and Bach number, we filled out special forms and sent them off to Salt Lake city.  I visited the complex in 1989 while on our way home after a ten week overseas holiday. .  I have lived in the UK in 1996 and 1998 and frequented many of the Record Office s for myself and others who live over in Australia, where I live. I used to share the expense of original Certificates back to the beginning of Civil Registration with a first cousin once removed who lived I the UK, as well, some of which of no use to me since finding my DNA family, though some of them are half family. None of the half family have surfaced in my DNA matches though.

 

It has only been  about three years since I started to use ancestry but in the same way as yourself. You have done it the right way. As you say not all trees are ridiculous, many are fine and have left blanks where they haven’t been sure of others work.  I leave blanks as well when nothing turns up that I need. At some stages a original record comes in a hint. Public trees though widely used are only a very small part of what ancestry has to offer. Many of which are under used.

 

I suppose you can teach by example, rather than getting annoyed (it doesn’t work) you can find the correct record, put the URL in the Web Link for them to find. Someone will correct and some will not. I do share the records as some can’t access  them if they do not have a paid subscription. At our Family History society,  we have a library edition members without their own paid account, use and they can print out from there. Most libraries have the same and patrons print out there as well.  The library edition isn’t the same though and they can only do so much with it.

Edie

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: aberloursearch via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 14:17
To: leshorn44@...; Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

 

Hi List,

 

I have been watching this thread with great interest, I have been researching my tree every day for more than 20 years now.

 

In the beginning i bought every Birth Marriage and Death certificates that were available from my parents back as far as civil registration began.

I then began to look at census records and took all the relevant information from all of those available.

I also visited New Register House in Edinburgh looking at wills etc. I also viewed all the Poor law records and Parish records to get as much information as possible.

 

I do look at trees on Ancestry and other various sites as i believe that not everyone has rubbish in their trees.

 

I dont copy any of the trees but if they have someone on their tree that may be linked to my family i can then check the information they have and see if it is correct or not. If it is not correct then all i have wasted is a bit of my time but at least they may have pointed me in the right direction to finding someone i have been looking for on my tree.

 

Ray

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Horn <leshorn44@...>
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Fri, 5 Nov 2021 7:42
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Ancestry tree errors

Hence the reason I avoid Ancestry.  There are far too many fanciful entries.

Keep Safe
Les

 


--
EdieMc

 


--
EdieMc