Date   

Re: Queen Elizabeth

Lindsay Graham
 

Janet, you appear to be assuming that United Kingdom and Great Britain are synonymous.  However, UK includes Northern Ireland, but GB does not.  For example, see the useful map/diagram at https://www.britannica.com/story/whats-the-difference-between-great-britain-and-the-united-kingdom.

Lindsay Graham
Canberra, Australia


On 2/1/21 01:48, Janet Farmer via groups.io wrote:
Happy New Year to everyone.

I'm not disagreeing with Anne just clarifying the Queen's title:

The official style of the monarch is "By the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the CommonwealthDefender of the Faith.  In plain language:  Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain (Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland), Canada  and the Commonwealth.


I think I've gotten it correct):-

Janet
_._,_._,_



Re: Church of Scotland

Glynn Currie
 

Happy New Year Everyone,
Thank you for all of your responses to my question . You have conformed what I had originally thought and added some details that were unknown. I appreciate that.
My question arose because I had read that the queen's church in Scotland was the Church of Scotland. Knowing she was head of the Church of England I jumped to the conclusion that the two churches might be the same. That misunderstanding was answered by the knowledge there are few Anglican family churches in 
Scotland. It would thus become natural for the monarch to attend the established Church under the circumstance.
Thanks again for your help.
Glynn


Queen Elizabeth

Janet Farmer
 

Happy New Year to everyone.

I'm not disagreeing with Anne just clarifying the Queen's title:

The official style of the monarch is "By the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, Canada and Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the CommonwealthDefender of the Faith.  In plain language:  Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain (Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland), Canada  and the Commonwealth.


I think I've gotten it correct):-

Janet


Re: Church of Scotland

Anne Burgess
 

The head of the Church of England is HM Queen Elizabeth, who is the second Queen Elizabeth in England but only the first to reign in Scotland. King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I of England, and every British monarch since James VI (James I of England) has been head of the C of E, including Charles II who did not actually convert to Roman Catholicism, and his brother James VII (James II of England), whose strong inclinations towards Roman Catholicism led to his abdication. See Wikipedia article on King Charles II of England.


Re: Church of Scotland

Anne Burgess
 

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 04:05 AM, <garyturnbull@sympatico.ca> wrote:


I believe the Presbyterian Church is the same thing as the Church of
Scotland.  It is the official or conformist church of Scotland.  All other
churches in Scotland are considered non-conformist.   The Anglican Church is
considered the official Church of England.  Again other denominations are
considered non-conformist.
No, that isn't correct. The Church of Scotland is Presbyterian, but it is not the only Presbyterian denomination in Scotland.

And the terms 'Conformist' and 'Non-conformist' are technically meaningless in Scotland. It originated in the 1660s, when the Church of England was restored in England as the official state religion. Anyone who refused to conform to the doctrines of the Church of England was called a non-conformist. This was before the union of Scotland with England-and-Wales in 1707 and the legislation defining the relationship of the Church of England to the monarch and government in England did not apply and never has applied in Scotland.

Presbyterians in Scotland who do not adhere to the Church of Scotland are Dissenters, not Non-conformists.

Anne


Re: Church of Scotland

Anne Burgess
 

The Church of Scotland and the Church of England are entirely independent of one another. There are differences in the forms of worship, but the fundamental difference is in how the church hierarchy is organised.

The Church of Scotland is one of many Presbyterian denominations.

Presbyterian churches do not have bishops. the hierarchy is a series of committees. Each congregation is managed by a committee called the Kirk Session, which consists of the minister and elders. Each one sends the minister and representative elder to the Presbytery, which is a committee that oversees a wider area, including all the parishes in that area. Every Presbytery belongs to a still larger area called a Synod, and all Synods belong to the General Assembly, which is made up of all ministers and some but far from all representative elders. Every Presbyterian denomination has its own Kirk Sessions and its own General Assembly so if you are speaking about the 'General Assembly' you should really specify which one - for example the 'General Assembly of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland' - but the term 'General Assembly' on its own is usually taken to mean the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.

The Church of England is one of many Episcopalian denominations. Episcopalian means that the church hierarchy includes bishops.

Apart from one or two small congregations the Church of England does not operate in Scotland. The corresponding Protestant Episcopalian denomination in Scotland is the Scottish Episcopal Church, also known as the Episcopal Church in Scotland, and sometimes referred to as the English Church. It is independent of the Church of England, but is in full communion with the Church of England as part of the worldwide Anglican Communion.

HTH

Anne


Re: Church of Scotland

W David Samuelsen
 

The head of the Church of England is Queen Elizabeth II. Every ruler since Henry VIII had been head of the Church of England, except maybe Charles II (was he, considering that he was Roman Catholic?)

David Samuelsen

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 9:05 PM <garyturnbull@...> wrote:

Hi Glynn

 

I believe the Presbyterian Church is the same thing as the Church of Scotland.  It is the official or conformist church of Scotland.  All other churches in Scotland are considered non-conformist.   The Anglican Church is considered the official Church of England.  Again other denominations are considered non-conformist.

 

Regards

Gary

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glynn Currie
Sent: December 31, 2020 2:17 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: [ScotGen] Church of Scotland

 

 

Happy Hogmanay,

 

I wonder if anyone can explain the relationship between the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian Church and the Church of England. I am having difficulty understanding some of the things I am reading.

Glynn

 

 

Sent from my Galaxy

 


Re: Church of Scotland

garyturnbull@...
 

Hi Glynn

 

I believe the Presbyterian Church is the same thing as the Church of Scotland.  It is the official or conformist church of Scotland.  All other churches in Scotland are considered non-conformist.   The Anglican Church is considered the official Church of England.  Again other denominations are considered non-conformist.

 

Regards

Gary

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glynn Currie
Sent: December 31, 2020 2:17 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: [ScotGen] Church of Scotland

 

 

Happy Hogmanay,

 

I wonder if anyone can explain the relationship between the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian Church and the Church of England. I am having difficulty understanding some of the things I am reading.

Glynn

 

 

Sent from my Galaxy

 


Re: Church of Scotland

Donald Young
 

Hi Glynn;
 
In Great Britain, the state recognizes or favours one denomination as the established church.  In England, the Anglican Church is the recognized church and becomes known as the Church of England. In Scotland, the government recognized the Presbyterian Church as the favoured denomination, and so it was styled the Church of Scotland. This recognition goes back several centuries when England and Scotland were separate, but what impact the distinction has today I don’t know. The Queen does have ties to the Church of England.
 
Hope this helps somewhat.
 
Donald Young  
 

Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2020 2:16 PM
Subject: [ScotGen] Church of Scotland
 
 
Happy Hogmanay,
 
I wonder if anyone can explain the relationship between the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian Church and the Church of England. I am having difficulty understanding some of the things I am reading.
Glynn
 
 
Sent from my Galaxy
 


Re: Church of Scotland

W David Samuelsen
 

Glynn Currie,

Church of Scotland is Presbyterian. 


Church of England is Anglican or Episcopal 


The differences

Hope this help you.



On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 12:17 PM Glynn Currie <glynn.currie@...> wrote:

Happy Hogmanay,

I wonder if anyone can explain the relationship between the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian Church and the Church of England. I am having difficulty understanding some of the things I am reading.
Glynn


Sent from my Galaxy


Church of Scotland

Glynn Currie
 


Happy Hogmanay,

I wonder if anyone can explain the relationship between the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian Church and the Church of England. I am having difficulty understanding some of the things I am reading.
Glynn


Sent from my Galaxy


What a year 2020 has been!

 

Dearest fellow genealogists,
 
As I write, it's a quiet Christmas night, in a quiet, distant holiday season. I miss the noise and fun of being with family, but I'm so thankful to you, each of you, for joining with me in this quest we have to discover and recover families who are out of touch with ancestors and living cousins too. 
 
Mastering Genealogical Proof by Thomas W. Jones was a Christmas present this year, and I was delighted to read on page one:
What is genealogy?
Genealogy is a research field concerned primarily with accurately reconstructing forgotten or unknown identities and relationships. Many of these relationships existed in the past, but genealogists' research also includes living people. Genealogy emphasizes biological and marital kinships, but also addresses adoptive, extramarital, and other kinds of relationships within and across generations. 
There has much grief and loss this year and I'm afraid more lies ahead. However, I see many reasons to be hopeful and anticipate some great things in the future. 
 
Happy holidays,
 
Valorie


Re: Mystery Photo SOLVED

Barbara Gooding
 

Yes, Fiona, you are correct!  Good sleuthing.  With a bit more digging, I found this Hugh Fraser's photo in another article in the San Francisco newspaper.  He was the organizer of several clans along the Pacific Coast and claimed to be a descendant of Lord Lovat of Inverness.  He died in 1921.


Re: Place name

Anne Burgess
 


Re: Place name

Glynn Currie
 

Thanks Donald. It is interesting to see the many "cousins" one gets after so many generations.
Glynn



Sent from my Galaxy


-------- Original message --------
From: Donald Young <donaldandkaren@...>
Date: 2020-12-24 19:27 (GMT-08:00)
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name

HI Glynn;
 
I am a descendant of Hugh Cameron who married a Nancy McNabb on Islay in 1826.  That’s all I have with a McNabb.
 
Thank you for posting.
 
Donald Young
 
Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 9:52 PM
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Ken,
Merry Christmas.
My paternal grandmother is descended fro two McNabb families who came from Islay and settled in Simcoe Ontario some time around 1830. I have not been able to connect them to a family in Islay. Andrew McNabb, b.1777, his wife Catherine Matheson, b. 1879, children: Findlay McNabb, 1813, Duncan McNabb b. 1810, James McNabb b.c. 1815. Would you have a connection?
Glynn
 
 
 
Sent from my Galaxy
 
 
-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Harrison <kenharrison43@...>
Date: 2020-12-24 18:29 (GMT-08:00)
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Donald,
It was indeed a farm, in the south of the island, and where several generations of my ancestry lived, from at least the late 1700s to mid 1800s.  They were tenant farmers and there were several families living and working on the farm at any given time.  Mine left for Canada in mid 1800s, while cousins stayed on Islay to the present time.
My lot were mainly McNabb (various spellings) and McVoran (various spellings, and anglicized in the early 1800s by some family groups to Morrison).  At least one branch in Ontario married a Young (perhaps yours).  I don’t have my data open right now, and seem to be a bit tied up with another event, but would be interested in pursuing this with you later.
Merry Christmas and a Vaccinated New Year!
Ken Harrison
Vancouver, Canada
 

On Dec 24, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Donald Young <donaldandkaren@...> wrote:

Hi all;

I have ancestors who lived at Ballicatrigan on the island of Islay in the 1790's.  I presume this is the name of a farm. Has anyone researched the name, and/or prepared a history of settlement there?
Thank you.

Donald Young
 


Re: Place name

Ken Harrison
 

Donald,

Apart from the use of the very small number of identical names used in Islay at the time, I can not find in my data any of the persons you name.  I have multiple cases of persons with the same names, but the dates and/or spouses show they come nowhere near matching your data.

Good Luck & Merrie Christmas.

Ken

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald Young
Sent: December 24, 2020 7:07 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name

 

Hi Ken;

 

When you have time, I would like to know more.

 

The earliest name I have is Duncan Cameron of Ballychatrigan.  His son Hugh married a Nancy McNabb in 1826 on Islay.  Duncan married a Margaret McVorran as a second wife in 1809 on Islay. I don’t know anything about Duncan or his first wife. I am a descendant of Hugh. 

 

Merry Christmas and happy new year.

Thank you

 


Re: Place name

Ken Harrison
 

Glynn,

I have your Andrew and Catherine (who I assume you meant was born 1779) in my data, plus 8 children and several generations below them.  Catherine sometimes went by the name McMath.  I have no data prior to the two of them.

I have not been able to prove any connection between my mob and Andrew’s, and all the data I have has been sent to me over the past couple of decades by other persons on predecessors to this List.

Please contact me off List at kenharrisonATShaw.ca and we can figure out how best for me to send to you what I have.

Ken

 

From: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glynn Currie
Sent: December 24, 2020 6:53 PM
To: Scots@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name

 

Ken,

Merry Christmas.

My paternal grandmother is descended fro two McNabb families who came from Islay and settled in Simcoe Ontario some time around 1830. I have not been able to connect them to a family in Islay. Andrew McNabb, b.1777, his wife Catherine Matheson, b. 1879, children: Findlay McNabb, 1813, Duncan McNabb b. 1810, James McNabb b.c. 1815. Would you have a connection?

Glynn

 


Re: Place name

Donald Young
 

Hi Ken;
 
Thank you for responding.  When you have some time, I would be interested in what you have.  My ancestor is Duncan Cameron of Ballichatrigan whose first spouse is unknown. His second wife was Margaret Mcvorran, whom he married in 1809 at Kidalton.  His son Hugh married a Nancy McNabb in 1826 at Kidalton. I know nothing about Duncan.  Hugh came to Canada in 1847.
 
Merry Christmas and happy New Year.
 
Donald Young
 

Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 9:29 PM
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Donald,
It was indeed a farm, in the south of the island, and where several generations of my ancestry lived, from at least the late 1700s to mid 1800s.  They were tenant farmers and there were several families living and working on the farm at any given time.  Mine left for Canada in mid 1800s, while cousins stayed on Islay to the present time.
My lot were mainly McNabb (various spellings) and McVoran (various spellings, and anglicized in the early 1800s by some family groups to Morrison).  At least one branch in Ontario married a Young (perhaps yours).  I don’t have my data open right now, and seem to be a bit tied up with another event, but would be interested in pursuing this with you later.
Merry Christmas and a Vaccinated New Year!
Ken Harrison
Vancouver, Canada
 

On Dec 24, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Donald Young <donaldandkaren@...> wrote:

Hi all;

I have ancestors who lived at Ballicatrigan on the island of Islay in the 1790's.  I presume this is the name of a farm. Has anyone researched the name, and/or prepared a history of settlement there?
Thank you.

Donald Young
 


Re: Place name

Donald Young
 

HI Glynn;
 
I am a descendant of Hugh Cameron who married a Nancy McNabb on Islay in 1826.  That’s all I have with a McNabb.
 
Thank you for posting.
 
Donald Young
 

Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 9:52 PM
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Ken,
Merry Christmas.
My paternal grandmother is descended fro two McNabb families who came from Islay and settled in Simcoe Ontario some time around 1830. I have not been able to connect them to a family in Islay. Andrew McNabb, b.1777, his wife Catherine Matheson, b. 1879, children: Findlay McNabb, 1813, Duncan McNabb b. 1810, James McNabb b.c. 1815. Would you have a connection?
Glynn
 
 
 
Sent from my Galaxy
 
 
-------- Original message --------
From: Ken Harrison <kenharrison43@...>
Date: 2020-12-24 18:29 (GMT-08:00)
To: Scots@scotland-genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Donald,
It was indeed a farm, in the south of the island, and where several generations of my ancestry lived, from at least the late 1700s to mid 1800s.  They were tenant farmers and there were several families living and working on the farm at any given time.  Mine left for Canada in mid 1800s, while cousins stayed on Islay to the present time.
My lot were mainly McNabb (various spellings) and McVoran (various spellings, and anglicized in the early 1800s by some family groups to Morrison).  At least one branch in Ontario married a Young (perhaps yours).  I don’t have my data open right now, and seem to be a bit tied up with another event, but would be interested in pursuing this with you later.
Merry Christmas and a Vaccinated New Year!
Ken Harrison
Vancouver, Canada
 

On Dec 24, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Donald Young <donaldandkaren@...> wrote:

Hi all;

I have ancestors who lived at Ballicatrigan on the island of Islay in the 1790's.  I presume this is the name of a farm. Has anyone researched the name, and/or prepared a history of settlement there?
Thank you.

Donald Young
 


Re: Place name

Donald Young
 

Hi Ken;
 
When you have time, I would like to know more.
 
The earliest name I have is Duncan Cameron of Ballychatrigan.  His son Hugh married a Nancy McNabb in 1826 on Islay.  Duncan married a Margaret McVorran as a second wife in 1809 on Islay. I don’t know anything about Duncan or his first wife. I am a descendant of Hugh. 
 
Merry Christmas and happy new year.
Thank you
 

Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2020 9:29 PM
Subject: Re: [ScotGen] Place name
 
Donald,
It was indeed a farm, in the south of the island, and where several generations of my ancestry lived, from at least the late 1700s to mid 1800s.  They were tenant farmers and there were several families living and working on the farm at any given time.  Mine left for Canada in mid 1800s, while cousins stayed on Islay to the present time.
My lot were mainly McNabb (various spellings) and McVoran (various spellings, and anglicized in the early 1800s by some family groups to Morrison).  At least one branch in Ontario married a Young (perhaps yours).  I don’t have my data open right now, and seem to be a bit tied up with another event, but would be interested in pursuing this with you later.
Merry Christmas and a Vaccinated New Year!
Ken Harrison
Vancouver, Canada
 

On Dec 24, 2020, at 5:58 PM, Donald Young <donaldandkaren@...> wrote:

Hi all;

I have ancestors who lived at Ballicatrigan on the island of Islay in the 1790's.  I presume this is the name of a farm. Has anyone researched the name, and/or prepared a history of settlement there?
Thank you.

Donald Young
 

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