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Ontario (Canada) Tweedsmuir History books digitization project completed


Sue Visser
 

 
 
Tweedsmuir Community History Books digitization project complete

The Federated Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO) have completed their three-year project to digitize 225,000 pages of the Tweedsmuir Community History Books, thanks to a $38,303 grant received in 2016 from Library and Archives Canada’s Documentary Heritage Communities Program.

According to FWIO, the Tweedsmuir Community History Books “capture and preserve local community history.”

These collections, with many starting in 1947, contain the history of a local community and can include farm and family histories, biographies, and photos.

Among the books digitized are those from women’s institutes as as far north as Cochrane in the northeast and Kenora in the northwest, down to beyond London in southwestern Ontario, and the Ottawa Valley in the east.

The public can freely access the Virtual Archives at http://collections.fwio.on.ca/search. As well, all the records can be found through the portal http://search.ourontario.ca.

Despite all this work, there is still a lot of work to be done.

A summary about the project indicates about half of the documents have not yet been opened to the public as they need to be reviewed for any privacy concerns, and this will happen over the next year or two.

As well, there are still many more books to be digitized. There is already a waiting list for digitizing from branches, districts, and holding organizations.


M E Fuller
 

Thank you for this. 

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 10:29 AM Sue Visser <genealgal2@...> wrote:
 
 
Tweedsmuir Community History Books digitization project complete
 

The Federated Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO) have completed their three-year project to digitize 225,000 pages of the Tweedsmuir Community History Books, thanks to a $38,303 grant received in 2016 from Library and Archives Canada’s Documentary Heritage Communities Program.

According to FWIO, the Tweedsmuir Community History Books “capture and preserve local community history.”

These collections, with many starting in 1947, contain the history of a local community and can include farm and family histories, biographies, and photos.

Among the books digitized are those from women’s institutes as as far north as Cochrane in the northeast and Kenora in the northwest, down to beyond London in southwestern Ontario, and the Ottawa Valley in the east.

The public can freely access the Virtual Archives at http://collections.fwio.on.ca/search. As well, all the records can be found through the portal http://search.ourontario.ca.

Despite all this work, there is still a lot of work to be done.

A summary about the project indicates about half of the documents have not yet been opened to the public as they need to be reviewed for any privacy concerns, and this will happen over the next year or two.

As well, there are still many more books to be digitized. There is already a waiting list for digitizing from branches, districts, and holding organizations.



--


M E Fuller | Worlds and Words
Word Specialist | Creative Writing Coach | Visual Artist

Saving the Ghost is available in paperback or for Kindle







Jean Hutchinson <mjhutch35@...>
 

Thank you for the information. 
Hope all is well with you and the family 
Jean 

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 11:29 AM Sue Visser <genealgal2@...> wrote:
 
 
Tweedsmuir Community History Books digitization project complete
 

The Federated Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO) have completed their three-year project to digitize 225,000 pages of the Tweedsmuir Community History Books, thanks to a $38,303 grant received in 2016 from Library and Archives Canada’s Documentary Heritage Communities Program.

According to FWIO, the Tweedsmuir Community History Books “capture and preserve local community history.”

These collections, with many starting in 1947, contain the history of a local community and can include farm and family histories, biographies, and photos.

Among the books digitized are those from women’s institutes as as far north as Cochrane in the northeast and Kenora in the northwest, down to beyond London in southwestern Ontario, and the Ottawa Valley in the east.

The public can freely access the Virtual Archives at http://collections.fwio.on.ca/search. As well, all the records can be found through the portal http://search.ourontario.ca.

Despite all this work, there is still a lot of work to be done.

A summary about the project indicates about half of the documents have not yet been opened to the public as they need to be reviewed for any privacy concerns, and this will happen over the next year or two.

As well, there are still many more books to be digitized. There is already a waiting list for digitizing from branches, districts, and holding organizations.


L MOON
 

Thanks Sue. 

 This will take a bit of studying to find my way around, but it very nice to know that the Tweedsmuir Books are available.  I knew several women who were members, including my Mother.

 

Be well.   Wash your hands !

Lois Moon

Vancouver Island, BC

 

From: Sue Visser
Sent: April 24, 2020 8:29 AM
To: ;
Cc: GEN LIST - ISLAY
Subject: [Islay] Ontario (Canada) Tweedsmuir History books digitization project completed

 

 

 

Tweedsmuir Community History Books digitization project complete

 

The Federated Women’s Institutes of Ontario (FWIO) have completed their three-year project to digitize 225,000 pages of the Tweedsmuir Community History Books, thanks to a $38,303 grant received in 2016 from Library and Archives Canada’s Documentary Heritage Communities Program.

According to FWIO, the Tweedsmuir Community History Books “capture and preserve local community history.”

These collections, with many starting in 1947, contain the history of a local community and can include farm and family histories, biographies, and photos.

Among the books digitized are those from women’s institutes as as far north as Cochrane in the northeast and Kenora in the northwest, down to beyond London in southwestern Ontario, and the Ottawa Valley in the east.

The public can freely access the Virtual Archives at http://collections.fwio.on.ca/search. As well, all the records can be found through the portal http://search.ourontario.ca.

Despite all this work, there is still a lot of work to be done.

A summary about the project indicates about half of the documents have not yet been opened to the public as they need to be reviewed for any privacy concerns, and this will happen over the next year or two.

As well, there are still many more books to be digitized. There is already a waiting list for digitizing from branches, districts, and holding organizations.