Date   

Re: The Highland Clearances

Glynn Currie
 

Very true Marian. Life in early Canada was very rough. But life as a tenant farmer in Scotland was also tough, even before the clearances. It took a hardy soul to survive those first few years in Canada; it was especially tough for those people who were too poor to be properly supplied when they arrived. The hard work, subsistence living and religious faith learned in Scotland was crucial to their survival. But the result was a great boon to Canada, because these were the people that built the country.

Glynn

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Marian Meldrum via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, April 10, 2021 12:17 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances

 

There was a programme on TV in UK some months ago which told the story of some families- they were recruited by a priest to go t Canada - promised all sorts - on arrival in Canada there was nothing and they were destitute - - they lived rough - and worked for very little and mainly of them succumbed to disease - the descendants were interviewed, and many still in touch with the families in Scotland - they conceded that their ancestors suffered - and were duped into going, however, their struggle meant their descendants now had a better life.

 

Controversial perhaps - but Something that everyone whose ancestors were taken/forced to go to a different place perhaps should contemplate what their lives would be like if their ancestors had stayed put

-----Original Message-----
From: Glynn Currie <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 9 Apr 2021 7:02
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances

It is no wonder those farmers came to Canada where they suffered huge deprivations and hard work. Here, depending on time and place, they received 200 acres of land for themselves! They were used to hardship and hard work anyway and the entire crop belonged to them. They could  build a better life for their families.

Glynn

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: bqbarnard@...
Sent: April 8, 2021 4:39 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances

 

Clearances in Scotland, evictions in Ireland and enclosures in England -- different names for the same phenomenon. Subsistence farmers were removed from the land, forced into towns or to emigrate, so that the land could be turned over to sheep whose wool fed the looms of the industrializing midlands, along with the cotton produced by slaves in the American south and Britain's Caribbean islands. Sheep were highly profitable and didn't rebel. Scottish Land Commission: "It found that about 1,125 owners, including Highland lairds and major public bodies such as Forest Enterprise and the National Trust for Scotland, own 70% of Scotland’s rural land, covering more than 4.1m hectares (10m acres) of countryside." And these days those "lairds" are mostly of English descent. 

 

 


Re: The Highland Clearances

Marian Meldrum
 

There was a programme on TV in UK some months ago which told the story of some families- they were recruited by a priest to go t Canada - promised all sorts - on arrival in Canada there was nothing and they were destitute - - they lived rough - and worked for very little and mainly of them succumbed to disease - the descendants were interviewed, and many still in touch with the families in Scotland - they conceded that their ancestors suffered - and were duped into going, however, their struggle meant their descendants now had a better life.

Controversial perhaps - but Something that everyone whose ancestors were taken/forced to go to a different place perhaps should contemplate what their lives would be like if their ancestors had stayed put


-----Original Message-----
From: Glynn Currie <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 9 Apr 2021 7:02
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances

It is no wonder those farmers came to Canada where they suffered huge deprivations and hard work. Here, depending on time and place, they received 200 acres of land for themselves! They were used to hardship and hard work anyway and the entire crop belonged to them. They could  build a better life for their families.
Glynn
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: bqbarnard@...
Sent: April 8, 2021 4:39 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances
 
Clearances in Scotland, evictions in Ireland and enclosures in England -- different names for the same phenomenon. Subsistence farmers were removed from the land, forced into towns or to emigrate, so that the land could be turned over to sheep whose wool fed the looms of the industrializing midlands, along with the cotton produced by slaves in the American south and Britain's Caribbean islands. Sheep were highly profitable and didn't rebel. Scottish Land Commission: "It found that about 1,125 owners, including Highland lairds and major public bodies such as Forest Enterprise and the National Trust for Scotland, own 70% of Scotland’s rural land, covering more than 4.1m hectares (10m acres) of countryside." And these days those "lairds" are mostly of English descent. 
 


Re: Islay McGilvrays Database + a note about the Clearances

Glynn Currie
 

Thanks for the information Toni. I will look for those books you mentioned. They sound interesting.

Glynn Currie

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: tsinclair@...
Sent: Friday, April 9, 2021 9:52 AM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Islay McGilvrays Database + a note about the Clearances

 

Thanks for sharing this with us, Russ.  I'm enjoying the photos of our "old" gatherings, and playing a guessing game with myself - trying to put names to the faces, before I cheat and read them!

I've been re-reading some books lately about Islay emigrants, especially those who settled in Ontario.  John Murdoch certainly was against the barbaric removal of Scottish peasants, and focused on the hardships they endured when they finally got to their promised land. John Ramsay of Kildalton visited many of his ex-tenants in Ontario in 1870, who all appeared to be doing very well in their new situations, and were thankful for the opportunity to bring their families to Ontario.  Of course, he was a landlord.  John McKorkindale from Islay came to Canada in 1855 (later than many emigrants), and visited many old friends and relatives.  From  observations written in his journal, he found both good and bad, but seemed appalled that that there was too much drinking at the barn raisings, and not enough church-going.  "Let's Reminisce about Nottawasaga", and "The Beaverton Story" both tell of early Islay pioneer life, their hardships and their triumphs.  What I find most interesting is that they clung together in these new settlements, helped each other, their children often married into other Islay families, and later even migrated to the U.S. or to Western Canada, still together.   Sadly, Scotland sent away some of its best sons and daughters, often with little regard as to what would happen to them.  Lucky Canada.
My thoughts,
Toni S.

 


Re: Islay McGilvrays Database + a note about the Clearances

tsinclair@...
 

Thanks for sharing this with us, Russ.  I'm enjoying the photos of our "old" gatherings, and playing a guessing game with myself - trying to put names to the faces, before I cheat and read them!

I've been re-reading some books lately about Islay emigrants, especially those who settled in Ontario.  John Murdoch certainly was against the barbaric removal of Scottish peasants, and focused on the hardships they endured when they finally got to their promised land. John Ramsay of Kildalton visited many of his ex-tenants in Ontario in 1870, who all appeared to be doing very well in their new situations, and were thankful for the opportunity to bring their families to Ontario.  Of course, he was a landlord.  John McKorkindale from Islay came to Canada in 1855 (later than many emigrants), and visited many old friends and relatives.  From  observations written in his journal, he found both good and bad, but seemed appalled that that there was too much drinking at the barn raisings, and not enough church-going.  "Let's Reminisce about Nottawasaga", and "The Beaverton Story" both tell of early Islay pioneer life, their hardships and their triumphs.  What I find most interesting is that they clung together in these new settlements, helped each other, their children often married into other Islay families, and later even migrated to the U.S. or to Western Canada, still together.   Sadly, Scotland sent away some of its best sons and daughters, often with little regard as to what would happen to them.  Lucky Canada.
My thoughts,
Toni S.


Re: Islay McGilvrays Database

Anne Farrar
 

Thank you, Russ. Unless you saved it many of the useful databases were lost in transition. Hopefully together we have most of them. Your databases with sources and notes will be a big help. Families are so intermarried that I have found so much info by cross referencing sources. Thanks for giving us all another leg up!!!


Re: The Highland Clearances

Glynn Currie
 

It is no wonder those farmers came to Canada where they suffered huge deprivations and hard work. Here, depending on time and place, they received 200 acres of land for themselves! They were used to hardship and hard work anyway and the entire crop belonged to them. They could  build a better life for their families.

Glynn

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: bqbarnard@...
Sent: April 8, 2021 4:39 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] The Highland Clearances

 

Clearances in Scotland, evictions in Ireland and enclosures in England -- different names for the same phenomenon. Subsistence farmers were removed from the land, forced into towns or to emigrate, so that the land could be turned over to sheep whose wool fed the looms of the industrializing midlands, along with the cotton produced by slaves in the American south and Britain's Caribbean islands. Sheep were highly profitable and didn't rebel. Scottish Land Commission: "It found that about 1,125 owners, including Highland lairds and major public bodies such as Forest Enterprise and the National Trust for Scotland, own 70% of Scotland’s rural land, covering more than 4.1m hectares (10m acres) of countryside." And these days those "lairds" are mostly of English descent. 

 


Islay McGilvrays Database

Russ McGillivray
 

Back in 2006 I created a database of McGilvrays of Islay and put it on Rootsweb WorldConnect. After Ancestry took over Rootsweb the site was degraded by stripping out the sources and notes, and covering half the screen with ads. I have deleted that site and ported it over to TribalPages. The link is https://www.tribalpages.com/tribe/browse?userid=islaymcgilvrays

Russ


Re: The Highland Clearances

bqbarnard@...
 

Clearances in Scotland, evictions in Ireland and enclosures in England -- different names for the same phenomenon. Subsistence farmers were removed from the land, forced into towns or to emigrate, so that the land could be turned over to sheep whose wool fed the looms of the industrializing midlands, along with the cotton produced by slaves in the American south and Britain's Caribbean islands. Sheep were highly profitable and didn't rebel. Scottish Land Commission: "It found that about 1,125 owners, including Highland lairds and major public bodies such as Forest Enterprise and the National Trust for Scotland, own 70% of Scotland’s rural land, covering more than 4.1m hectares (10m acres) of countryside." And these days those "lairds" are mostly of English descent. 


Re: The Highland Clearances

John Kemplen
 

Here is an Islay-specific piece:
https://www.islayinfo.com/islay_clearances.html

My family (McKellars) moved in to Islay around 1840 when many others were being moved out, to live at Kilbranan (where four farmers had been evicted), working as shepherds, I believe, for the under-factor Webster who appears to have been one of the main villains of the piece.


On 08/04/2021 03:14, Glynn Currie wrote:

I have just finished reading The Highland Clearances by TM Devine and wanted to share it . Following this note is a review I wrote.




In The Scottish Clearances, TM Devine argues the Highland clearances are quite misunderstood. Popular fiction, sensationalist accounts and sentimental story telling have created a myth that clouds the facts and hides the truth behind a mist of romanticism. In this book Devine takes on the task of setting the record straight.

Devine believes the highland clearances were not a singular event, but a part of a broader action that covered the entire country. He studied the removal of people from land worked by generations of their ancestors across the whole of Scotland. Historical events of the time, as well as the social history and the economic patterns of the time are marshalled together to support his claim.

In anticipation of counter arguments, Devine looked at his thesis from many perspectives. Several times I formed an argument against his thesis only to read his response in a later chapter.

Because of the broad approach which Devine takes to his topic he provides the reader with an excellent view of life in 18th and 19th Century rural Scotland. For someone interested in genealogy, the opportunity to learn about farming practices and life on the croft is appreciated.

According to Devine, economic forces were the cause of the clearances, not only in the Highlands, but in the rest of Scotland as well. They were inevitable and lacked any moral concern. While hard on tenants, land owners had little choice and were forced to remove people from their land in order to play a role in the new agricultural economy.

This is where I diverge from Devine’s thesis. His history is sound, but he approaches it from a mechanistic viewpoint supporting free market capitalism. He assigns no blame to land owners, in their callous disregard for their farmers, because the impartial broom of the free market swept people away in an amoral pursuit of progress.

He doesn’t consider the theft of the land by the landlords as a concern. He accepts that as a given. But it is that theft which lies behind the problems faced by the tenant farmers who were removed from their land.

In an earlier time, clan chiefs were not the owners of land, but the leaders of a community. The land was owned by that community and the produce from it was shared among everyone, including the chiefs who didn’t actually work the land. Land was owned by the community and the chiefs were responsible to administer its use. So social was the community resource that individual farmers worked different patches of land from year to year in order to share the good and the bad land in a fair manner. For those farmers to be forced from their land so the descendants of the former chiefs could claim the land and increase their wealth was treachery on a grand scale.

For people who are interested in Scottish history and who wish to understand the lives of their ancestors this book is a must read. It is the story of the people of Scotland caught up in a changing world and forced to contend with forces beyond their control. With a stoic manner and the fortitude gained from a lifetime of suffering and hard work, they met the challenge thrown at them and persevered. That is the legacy they have left to us, their descendants.

 

Devine, T.M. The Scottish Clearances, Penguin Books, 2019.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


The Highland Clearances

Glynn Currie
 

I have just finished reading The Highland Clearances by TM Devine and wanted to share it . Following this note is a review I wrote.




In The Scottish Clearances, TM Devine argues the Highland clearances are quite misunderstood. Popular fiction, sensationalist accounts and sentimental story telling have created a myth that clouds the facts and hides the truth behind a mist of romanticism. In this book Devine takes on the task of setting the record straight.

Devine believes the highland clearances were not a singular event, but a part of a broader action that covered the entire country. He studied the removal of people from land worked by generations of their ancestors across the whole of Scotland. Historical events of the time, as well as the social history and the economic patterns of the time are marshalled together to support his claim.

In anticipation of counter arguments, Devine looked at his thesis from many perspectives. Several times I formed an argument against his thesis only to read his response in a later chapter.

Because of the broad approach which Devine takes to his topic he provides the reader with an excellent view of life in 18th and 19th Century rural Scotland. For someone interested in genealogy, the opportunity to learn about farming practices and life on the croft is appreciated.

According to Devine, economic forces were the cause of the clearances, not only in the Highlands, but in the rest of Scotland as well. They were inevitable and lacked any moral concern. While hard on tenants, land owners had little choice and were forced to remove people from their land in order to play a role in the new agricultural economy.

This is where I diverge from Devine’s thesis. His history is sound, but he approaches it from a mechanistic viewpoint supporting free market capitalism. He assigns no blame to land owners, in their callous disregard for their farmers, because the impartial broom of the free market swept people away in an amoral pursuit of progress.

He doesn’t consider the theft of the land by the landlords as a concern. He accepts that as a given. But it is that theft which lies behind the problems faced by the tenant farmers who were removed from their land.

In an earlier time, clan chiefs were not the owners of land, but the leaders of a community. The land was owned by that community and the produce from it was shared among everyone, including the chiefs who didn’t actually work the land. Land was owned by the community and the chiefs were responsible to administer its use. So social was the community resource that individual farmers worked different patches of land from year to year in order to share the good and the bad land in a fair manner. For those farmers to be forced from their land so the descendants of the former chiefs could claim the land and increase their wealth was treachery on a grand scale.

For people who are interested in Scottish history and who wish to understand the lives of their ancestors this book is a must read. It is the story of the people of Scotland caught up in a changing world and forced to contend with forces beyond their control. With a stoic manner and the fortitude gained from a lifetime of suffering and hard work, they met the challenge thrown at them and persevered. That is the legacy they have left to us, their descendants.

 

Devine, T.M. The Scottish Clearances, Penguin Books, 2019.


Re: WILLIAM, DONALD, DUNCAN MORRISON

Ken Harrison
 

Hi Donald,

The closest I have is doubtful, and comes to me from another researcher.

I have a Neil Morrison, b. before 1780, seen in 1841, apparently a widower, aged “60”, at Stremnishmore, with son Angus 18 and probable other children Bel 20 and John 16.

I have no further info on any of them other than Angus, and do not have a name for Neil’s wife.

Angus *may* have married 1848 in Oa to Mary Macarthur, and was seen in 1881 in Oro Twp, Ontario.

Ken

 

From: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io <Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io> On Behalf Of Donald Young
Sent: April 3, 2021 7:09 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] WILLIAM, DONALD, DUNCAN MORRISON

 

Hi Ken;

i don't think I posted this already. You had stated that the McVorran name was changed to Morrison.  I have been reviewing the family tree.  I have a Neil Morrison whose spouse was Mary Cameron 1793 - 1865.  I don't have any dates for Neil. They came from Kildalton to Onatrio.   They may have come with her brother Hugh and his family in 1847.  Do you recognize these names?

Donald Young


Re: WILLIAM, DONALD, DUNCAN MORRISON

Donald Young
 

Hi Ken;

i don't think I posted this already. You had stated that the McVorran name was changed to Morrison.  I have been reviewing the family tree.  I have a Neil Morrison whose spouse was Mary Cameron 1793 - 1865.  I don't have any dates for Neil. They came from Kildalton to Onatrio.   They may have come with her brother Hugh and his family in 1847.  Do you recognize these names?

Donald Young


Re: Ontario (Canada) Tweedsmuir History books digitization project completed

M. Diane Rogers
 

The Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario Digital Collections are here: https://collections.fwio.on.ca/search 

Diane R




Re: Ontario (Canada) Tweedsmuir History books digitization project completed

Heather Schenck-Smith <heatherss.stratford@...>
 

The ladies from the local WI branches worked hard on these digital copies. If you cannot find an answer, you can try to contact the local branch secretaries. Go to FWIO website and find the menu that has branches. 

Heather Schenck-Smith
519-273-6916


Re: Farm Community

J LOCHRIDGE
 

Thanks for your note. I hope you find the answers you seek

Regards

Johan




------ Original Message ------
From: "Glynn Currie" <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: "Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io" <Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, 6 Mar, 21 At 20:39
Subject: Re: [Islay] Farm Community

Yes. The farm was Duich Lotts (or Duich Lots). It is of special interest to me because both my grandfather and great grandfather lived there. For now my interest lies more in learning about the life style of the time than in reading documents to push the family line back any further. Hence the attempt to learn about the farm.

Glynn

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: J LOCHRIDGE via groups.io
Sent: March 6, 2021 12:28 AM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Farm Community

Good Morning Glynn,

That sounds like a very interesting piece of work but I am sure I won't be the only one who wants to know the name of the farm. I don't have any academic knowledge of farms/land etc but I have heard the description, "Farm Village" before now. That would be when there would be a farm house and a number of cottages or buildings for farm workers, eg shepherd, cattleman, ploughman, to name but a few.

I look forward to learning more too, from the answers which I am sure will be forthcoming.

Regards

Johan





------ Original Message ------
From: "Glynn Currie" <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 6 Mar, 21 At 05:29
Subject: [Islay] Farm Community

I have completed a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn




Re: Farm Community

Glynn Currie
 

Thanks. I will check that out.

Glynn

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Doug Carmichael
Sent: March 6, 2021 12:24 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Farm Community

 

Glen, there is a good deal of detail reguarding  Scotish agriculture  during the 1813 onward removals in Sutherland.

 SET ADRIFT UPON THE WORLD is the title , James Hunter is the author. Cheers Douglas Carmichael.

On Mar 6, 2021 01:29, Glynn Currie <familyhistoryguy@...> wrote:

I have completed  a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn

 

 


Re: Farm Community

Glynn Currie
 

Yes. The farm was Duich Lotts (or Duich Lots). It is of special interest to me because both my grandfather and great grandfather lived there. For now my interest lies more in learning about the life style of the time than in reading documents to push the family line back any further. Hence the attempt to learn about the farm.

Glynn

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: J LOCHRIDGE via groups.io
Sent: March 6, 2021 12:28 AM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Farm Community

 

Good Morning Glynn,

That sounds like a very interesting piece of work but I am sure I won't be the only one who wants to know the name of the farm. I don't have any academic knowledge of farms/land etc but I have heard the description, "Farm Village" before now. That would be when there would be a farm house and a number of cottages or buildings for farm workers, eg shepherd, cattleman, ploughman, to name but a few.

I look forward to learning more too, from the answers which I am sure will be forthcoming.

Regards

Johan





------ Original Message ------
From: "Glynn Currie" <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 6 Mar, 21 At 05:29
Subject: [Islay] Farm Community

I have completed a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn

 

 


Re: Farm Community

Doug Carmichael
 

Glen, there is a good deal of detail reguarding  Scotish agriculture  during the 1813 onward removals in Sutherland.
 SET ADRIFT UPON THE WORLD is the title , James Hunter is the author. Cheers Douglas Carmichael.

On Mar 6, 2021 01:29, Glynn Currie <familyhistoryguy@...> wrote:
I have completed  a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn


Re: Farm Community

J LOCHRIDGE
 

Good Morning Glynn,

That sounds like a very interesting piece of work but I am sure I won't be the only one who wants to know the name of the farm. I don't have any academic knowledge of farms/land etc but I have heard the description, "Farm Village" before now. That would be when there would be a farm house and a number of cottages or buildings for farm workers, eg shepherd, cattleman, ploughman, to name but a few.

I look forward to learning more too, from the answers which I am sure will be forthcoming.

Regards

Johan




------ Original Message ------
From: "Glynn Currie" <familyhistoryguy@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, 6 Mar, 21 At 05:29
Subject: [Islay] Farm Community

I have completed a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn



Farm Community

Glynn Currie
 

I have completed  a spread sheet based on the 1871 Census for an Islay farm. It raises a number of interesting questions. I wonder if anyone can add to or modify my thoughts.
The term "farm" has two different usages here. The first use describes the entire piece of land used by a small community of people. The second use describes a small piece of that land, farmed by one farmer.
The farm community had 74 people living in 16 family groupings listed in the census. Not everyone had a job listed. I wonder if they would have been working together on a family farm.
9 people were listed as farmers. Each had a piece of land varying from 20 to 60 acres. However, only a small piece of each farm was arable land varying from 5 to 10 acres. In fact of the total 320 acres available for farming, only 92 were arable land suited for crops.
1 person was listed as a crofter and 1 was listed as a herdsman.
I wonder what the difference between the crofter and the farmers would be.
Would the herdsman be responsible for a community herd? Or would that herd belong to an absentee person, the land owner or the tacksman?
Presumably the land was owned by an aristocratic landlord, such as the Campbells and was managed by a tacksman who would not have lived there. I wonder about differing social status levels of the people living on the farm. Would the farmers be considered the highest status people in the community?
Would people move onto and off of the farm at frequent intervals, or would most of them be inclined to live on the farm for life?
If anyone could help me to learn about this life style I would appreciate it. Possibly there are other readers who would find it interesting as well.
Glynn

1 - 20 of 583