Date   

Re: Property Registration Deeds

Glynn Currie
 

Thanks once again Seymour. You are always very helpful and it is appreciated.

Glynn

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Seymour Hosking
Sent: October 16, 2021 9:27 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Property Registration Deeds

 

Property deeds are available from the Land Registry https://landregistryservice.uk/services/scotland

Old records are held in the Register of Sasines which are searched from the same site and cost about £30 per property.

regards Seymour

 


Re: Property Registration Deeds

 

Property deeds are available from the Land Registry https://landregistryservice.uk/services/scotland

Old records are held in the Register of Sasines which are searched from the same site and cost about £30 per property.

regards Seymour


Property Registration Deeds

Glynn Currie
 

Does anyone know how, or if it is possible, to view property deeds in Bowmore?
Glynn


Re: Bowmore Street Project

Glynn Currie
 

Here is the 1885 Assessment Roll. It would be good to see if we could match up the residents listed in the assessment roll as living in Bowmore with the building in which they lived.
Glynn


Bowmore Street Project

Glynn Currie
 

Streets Project

For quite some time I have wondered where my paternal grandmother was born. Her husband, my grandfather, was born on a farm at Duich Lott's in Kildalton. While not knowing which of several houses he lived in, somehow knowing it was on the farm seemed enough. But Grandma Currie was born in town. That left open the question which house was hers.

In 1883 Flora McDiarmid was born to Archibald McDiarmid and Agnes MacDonald on Shore Street in Bowmore. But which house? Even which side of the street? I wanted to know.

To find out I began a project to look at Bowmore and see if I could identify the building.  The project contained three parts. First it was necessary to identify the people living in Bowmore at the time of my grandmother’s birth. To do so I examined the Valuation rolls from 1885 and 1895 to see where Archibald McDiarmid was living. Then I needed to identify the homes located in Bowmore at the time. For this I consulted a map of Bowmore from 1882 and looked at Google Earth images of the town today to see what the buildings looked like. I hoped that by using significant commercial buildings, it would be possible to count and number houses until the appropriate residence could be assigned to a particular family.

For this project to work I began with an assumption that the valuation rolls were established in the same order as the buildings were located on the streets.

When filing the Google Earth images, I assumed that Main Street ran north and south and that Shore Street ran east and west. Labels on the images reflect this assumption.

My hope is this project will answer my question about the places my grandmother lived in Bowmore and will also be useful in establishing where other ancestors lived. Perhaps other people will be able to use it to answer similar questions.


Re: Islay Place Names doc

Sue Visser
 

Hi John
I forwarded your email to Bob.
Cheers,
Sue
 

From: John Kemplen via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2021 7:14 AM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] Islay Place Names doc
 

Thanks for copying this file to us, Sue.  Is Bob in this group or would I have to e-mail him direct to thank him for this update?

One small update to his Note 1: if you want to buy paper maps, the 1:50,000 Landranger map is still sheet 60, but the 1:25,000 mapping  is no longer the Pathfinder series.  It is now the much-improved Explorer series, and Islay is covered by two sheets: 352, Islay South, and 353, Islay North.  Bridgend and Bowmore are on both sheets; Kilmeny (Port Askaig, Caolila, Bunnahabhain, Keills and Ballygrant) and the Rhinns (Portnahaven, Port Charlotte and Bruichladdich) are only on the north sheet; and Kildalton and the Oa (including Port Ellen, Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg) are only on the south sheet.  The north sheet is double-sided and the south sheet is single-sided.  Both are a delight for anyone who likes maps.

Regards

John

 

On 29/08/2021 11:38, Sue Visser wrote:
Bob McQueen of New Zealand has updated his Islay Farms/Place Names doc to include GPS coordinates and Google maps links.  He’s asked that I try to get it ‘out there’ as the updated version.  Enjoy playing with it using the maps and satellite view.  Check it out *smile*.
 
Happy hunting,
Sue Visser

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Islay Place Names doc

John Kemplen
 

Thanks for copying this file to us, Sue.  Is Bob in this group or would I have to e-mail him direct to thank him for this update?

One small update to his Note 1: if you want to buy paper maps, the 1:50,000 Landranger map is still sheet 60, but the 1:25,000 mapping  is no longer the Pathfinder series.  It is now the much-improved Explorer series, and Islay is covered by two sheets: 352, Islay South, and 353, Islay North.  Bridgend and Bowmore are on both sheets; Kilmeny (Port Askaig, Caolila, Bunnahabhain, Keills and Ballygrant) and the Rhinns (Portnahaven, Port Charlotte and Bruichladdich) are only on the north sheet; and Kildalton and the Oa (including Port Ellen, Laphroaig, Lagavulin and Ardbeg) are only on the south sheet.  The north sheet is double-sided and the south sheet is single-sided.  Both are a delight for anyone who likes maps.

Regards

John


On 29/08/2021 11:38, Sue Visser wrote:
Bob McQueen of New Zealand has updated his Islay Farms/Place Names doc to include GPS coordinates and Google maps links.  He’s asked that I try to get it ‘out there’ as the updated version.  Enjoy playing with it using the maps and satellite view.  Check it out *smile*.
 
Happy hunting,
Sue Visser

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Islay Place Names doc

Sue Visser
 

Bob McQueen of New Zealand has updated his Islay Farms/Place Names doc to include GPS coordinates and Google maps links.  He’s asked that I try to get it ‘out there’ as the updated version.  Enjoy playing with it using the maps and satellite view.  Check it out *smile*.
 
Happy hunting,
Sue Visser


Robert J. McQueen

Sue Visser
 

Bob – if you are still a member here, please contact me.  I emailed you about your research but it was returned as ‘undeliverable’.
Thanks,
Sue Visser
 


Re: *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

Lorne & Susan Campbell
 

Another site for research findagrave.com is particularly helpful if the contributor also records related family connections and history. There are some records for graves in the UK and Europe but not as many as in USA and Canada.

 

Also genetic genealogy can help locate cousins for possible further research. Recently through familytreedna.com I located a 3rd cousin who had a photo of my 2nd great grandmother which I have never seen before.

 

Yes, we miss Jack Puttenham, my brother-in-law, who introduced me to genealogy many years ago.

 

Lorne

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Sue Visser
Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2021 12:43 PM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

 

I totally agree with you Toni.  It was through you that I met Jack Puttenham and both of you are GenAngels.  I have a binder of hard copies of his OPR transcriptions.  I remembered he died near my late Father’s birthday – Jack died last June 6. 

Take care; keep well,

Sue

 

 

From: tsinclair@...

Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2021 9:38 AM

To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io

Subject: Re: [Islay] *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

 

This is a great idea, Seymour.  Sorry for the delay in my response, but I was trying to find some old Islay research notebooks from years ago.  Back in 2000, I met Jack Puttenham, of Hamilton, Ontario who transcribed the Islay OPRs, and generously made them available online for all to use, for free.  He was a volunteer at the local LDS library, and became my mentor in Islay research, and helped me to find all sorts of wonderful information.  I was able to access the "Islay Estate Papers", available on microfilm by ordering them through that library, and I spent many happy hours there, pouring over Islay tenantry etc., and filling notebooks!

What I would suggest is to start out with the LDS website "Familysearch.org", (where they have transcribed innumerable international documents)  You'll need to sign in to get access, but there are no strings attached in case you're doubtful.  Type in the ancestor's name(s) and any other relevant info, and bingo. You'll get a list of possible matches.  Click on the one you think is most likely.   If they have info for your particular search, you'll get it.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you'll see the source.  I think there's a way to order the actual microfilm if you want to, or go to your local LDS library.

Anyway, it's a good way to find ancestral information.  I know there are many other resources too, but this is my "Go to" site first.  And if I've ever been able to help other Islay researchers, then we all have Jack P. to thank.  He passed away about a year ago, but his legacy lives on!
Toni

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

 


Re: *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

Sue Visser
 

I totally agree with you Toni.  It was through you that I met Jack Puttenham and both of you are GenAngels.  I have a binder of hard copies of his OPR transcriptions.  I remembered he died near my late Father’s birthday – Jack died last June 6. 
Take care; keep well,
Sue
 
 

From: tsinclair@...
Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2021 9:38 AM
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Islay] *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***
 
This is a great idea, Seymour.  Sorry for the delay in my response, but I was trying to find some old Islay research notebooks from years ago.  Back in 2000, I met Jack Puttenham, of Hamilton, Ontario who transcribed the Islay OPRs, and generously made them available online for all to use, for free.  He was a volunteer at the local LDS library, and became my mentor in Islay research, and helped me to find all sorts of wonderful information.  I was able to access the "Islay Estate Papers", available on microfilm by ordering them through that library, and I spent many happy hours there, pouring over Islay tenantry etc., and filling notebooks!

What I would suggest is to start out with the LDS website "Familysearch.org", (where they have transcribed innumerable international documents)  You'll need to sign in to get access, but there are no strings attached in case you're doubtful.  Type in the ancestor's name(s) and any other relevant info, and bingo. You'll get a list of possible matches.  Click on the one you think is most likely.   If they have info for your particular search, you'll get it.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you'll see the source.  I think there's a way to order the actual microfilm if you want to, or go to your local LDS library.

Anyway, it's a good way to find ancestral information.  I know there are many other resources too, but this is my "Go to" site first.  And if I've ever been able to help other Islay researchers, then we all have Jack P. to thank.  He passed away about a year ago, but his legacy lives on!
Toni


Re: *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

tsinclair@...
 

This is a great idea, Seymour.  Sorry for the delay in my response, but I was trying to find some old Islay research notebooks from years ago.  Back in 2000, I met Jack Puttenham, of Hamilton, Ontario who transcribed the Islay OPRs, and generously made them available online for all to use, for free.  He was a volunteer at the local LDS library, and became my mentor in Islay research, and helped me to find all sorts of wonderful information.  I was able to access the "Islay Estate Papers", available on microfilm by ordering them through that library, and I spent many happy hours there, pouring over Islay tenantry etc., and filling notebooks!

What I would suggest is to start out with the LDS website "Familysearch.org", (where they have transcribed innumerable international documents)  You'll need to sign in to get access, but there are no strings attached in case you're doubtful.  Type in the ancestor's name(s) and any other relevant info, and bingo. You'll get a list of possible matches.  Click on the one you think is most likely.   If they have info for your particular search, you'll get it.  If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you'll see the source.  I think there's a way to order the actual microfilm if you want to, or go to your local LDS library. 

Anyway, it's a good way to find ancestral information.  I know there are many other resources too, but this is my "Go to" site first.  And if I've ever been able to help other Islay researchers, then we all have Jack P. to thank.  He passed away about a year ago, but his legacy lives on!
Toni


Re: *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

candy@...
 

Hi Seymour, I am on FB and saw that post.  Agree there is always things to learn no matter how long you have been doing it.  I know I need to know more about Scottish research even though I have been doing it a long time.  I love Scotlands People, just wish we could have a subscription rather than pay per view.  I live in Australia and work part time, so timing for me can be an issue.  I belong to Society of Australian Genealogists and do a lot of Webinars with them.  We have a Lost is Scotland Webinar coming up this month and there are some presenters from Scotland.


Re: Archibald CAMPBELL b Islay 1805, s/o Archibald Campbell, tacksman of Ardmore, Kildalton Parish

Malcolm Campbell
 

Hi Sue

Very Interesting.

This Archibald is not in my tree. Found my CAMPBELL line in LDS's Family Search, back to the 1550's. if one can believe what one reads?

https://www.ancestry.ca/family-tree/person/tree/17182994/person/473521819/facts

No Archibald.

Will subscribe to The Ileach when I am able to return to Islay.

Thanks for sharing this.

My best,

Malcolm


---------- Original Message ----------
From: Sue Visser <genealgal2@...>
Date: June 7, 2021 at 6:53 AM

This is an article in the latest issue of The Ileach (I receive mine in e-format – you might want to consider doing the same)
Happy Hunting,
Sue Visser
 
 
 
This article is an excerpt from a book written by Les Wilson. It is shared with permission of the author, Les Wilson, via The Ileach. If you connect with this family, Les would be happy to hear from you. leswilsonislay@...
 
 
Putting the Tea in Britain Islay author, Les Wilson, relates the story of Islay’s Archibald Campbel
 
Islay is famous for malt whisky, but it has a claim to be the birthplace of another famous drink – the finest tea in the world, Darjeeling. Les Wilson, the author of a new book about Scotland’s role in the history of tea, reveals all: I n 1840 a rising star of the British Empire was sent on a mission to establish a British outpost on a mountain ridge that the native tribes people called Dorji Ling ‘the place of thunderbolts’ in the foothills of the Himalayas. Archibald Campbell was born on Islay in 1805, the sixth child and third son of Archibald senior, the tacksman of Ardmore in the parish of Kildalton. Young Archibald would lead an extraordinary and adventurous life. He graduated in medicine from Edinburgh University and travelled to India as an East India Company ship’s surgeon. After a spell as a military doctor in India, Campbell was appointed surgeon at Kathmandu in Nepal. A natural linguist (he would have left Islay bilingual in English and Gaelic) he quickly picked up Nepalese. The ‘intelligent and zealous’ doctor was soon assigned diplomatic duties, and his appointment to Darjeeling was a move in ‘the great game’ to protect Britain’s ‘buffer state’ of Sikkim, from being conquered by the warlike Nepalese Gorkhas who might then go on to threaten British Assam. Campbell energetically began to develop his little mountain fiefdom in the British manner – building roads, European-style houses, a church and a bazaar to bring traders. Doctors at this time relied entirely on plant-based medicines and Archibald Campbell was a skilled botanist. Among the plants he introduced to his estate was tea – plants from the stock recently smuggled from China by another Scottish tea pioneer, Robert Fortune. Campbell’s flourishing tea bushes encouraged other growers, many of them Scots, and by 1856 there were 39 tea gardens with 10,000 acres under cultivation. Today there are more than 80 tea gardens in the valleys around Darjeeling. Ones like Bannockburn and Glendale serve as working memorials to the Scots who first cleared, planted and named them. Campbell was delighted to host the plant-hunting expedition led by the famous botanist Joseph Hooker who was on his way to Sikkim. Hooker had been raised in Glasgow and Helensburgh from where he made youthful botanical expeditions to Arran and Argyll. The two men became firm friends and Campbell accompanied Hooker into Sikkim. But while the Raja of Sikkim had given permission for the expedition, he had forbidden the pair to cross into Tibet. When they disobeyed this rule, they were arrested, and handed back over to Sikkim Sepoys who bound and beat Campbell, threatening him with knives. The hardy Ileach, reported Hooker, ‘defended himself with a stick.’ The Sikkimese resented Campbell for the part he played in Britain’s interference in their country and that night, when Campbell tried to leave the overcrowded hut they had been put in, things turned nasty. Hooker recalled: ‘He had scarcely left when I head him calling loudly to me, “Hooker! Hooker! The savages are murdering me!” I rushed to the door and caught sight of him striking out with his fists, and struggling violently; being tall and powerful, he had already prostrated a few, but, a host of men bore him down, and appeared to be trampling on him; at the same moment I was myself seized by eight men, who forced me back into the hut ...’ Campbell was tortured and threatened with execution, and it was only the arrival of a British regiment on Sikkim’s border that secured the release of the two men. Despite its dramatic ending, the expedition was a huge scientific success, and Joseph Hooker would eventually succeed his father as the Director of Kew Gardens. As for Campbell – his legacy is the greatest tea in the world.
 
Putting the Tea in Britain: The Scots Who Made Our National Drink, by Les Wilson, was published by Birlinn on 3 June.
 
______________________
 
I’m not related. Checking the OPR transcriptions, I suspect this might be the family:
 
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Margt

b 28 Mar 1799 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Mary

b 24 Mar 1800 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
John

b 16 Mar 1801 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Marion

b 20 Apr 1802 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
William

b 16 Dec 1803 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Nelly Ardmore Arch 30 Apr 1805


Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Nelly Ardmore daug 1 Apr 1806


Kildalton


 


Archibald CAMPBELL b Islay 1805, s/o Archibald Campbell, tacksman of Ardmore, Kildalton Parish

Sue Visser
 

This is an article in the latest issue of The Ileach (I receive mine in e-format – you might want to consider doing the same)
Happy Hunting,
Sue Visser
 
 
 
This article is an excerpt from a book written by Les Wilson.  It is shared with permission of the author, Les Wilson, via The Ileach.  If you connect with this family, Les would be happy to hear from you.  leswilsonislay@...
 
 
Putting the Tea in Britain Islay author, Les Wilson, relates the story of Islay’s Archibald Campbel
 
Islay is famous for malt whisky, but it has a claim to be the birthplace of another famous drink – the finest tea in the world, Darjeeling. Les Wilson, the author of a new book about Scotland’s role in the history of tea, reveals all: I n 1840 a rising star of the British Empire was sent on a mission to establish a British outpost on a mountain ridge that the native tribes people called Dorji Ling ‘the place of thunderbolts’ in the foothills of the Himalayas. Archibald Campbell was born on Islay in 1805, the sixth child and third son of Archibald senior, the tacksman of Ardmore in the parish of Kildalton. Young Archibald would lead an extraordinary and adventurous life. He graduated in medicine from Edinburgh University and travelled to India as an East India Company ship’s surgeon. After a spell as a military doctor in India, Campbell was appointed surgeon at Kathmandu in Nepal. A natural linguist (he would have left Islay bilingual in English and Gaelic) he quickly picked up Nepalese. The ‘intelligent and zealous’ doctor was soon assigned diplomatic duties, and his appointment to Darjeeling was a move in ‘the great game’ to protect Britain’s ‘buffer state’ of Sikkim, from being conquered by the warlike Nepalese Gorkhas who might then go on to threaten British Assam. Campbell energetically began to develop his little mountain fiefdom in the British manner – building roads, European-style houses, a church and a bazaar to bring traders. Doctors at this time relied entirely on plant-based medicines and Archibald Campbell was a skilled botanist. Among the plants he introduced to his estate was tea – plants from the stock recently smuggled from China by another Scottish tea pioneer, Robert Fortune. Campbell’s flourishing tea bushes encouraged other growers, many of them Scots, and by 1856 there were 39 tea gardens with 10,000 acres under cultivation. Today there are more than 80 tea gardens in the valleys around Darjeeling. Ones like Bannockburn and Glendale serve as working memorials to the Scots who first cleared, planted and named them. Campbell was delighted to host the plant-hunting expedition led by the famous botanist Joseph Hooker who was on his way to Sikkim. Hooker had been raised in Glasgow and Helensburgh from where he made youthful botanical expeditions to Arran and Argyll. The two men became firm friends and Campbell accompanied Hooker into Sikkim. But while the Raja of Sikkim had given permission for the expedition, he had forbidden the pair to cross into Tibet. When they disobeyed this rule, they were arrested, and handed back over to Sikkim Sepoys who bound and beat Campbell, threatening him with knives. The hardy Ileach, reported Hooker, ‘defended himself with a stick.’ The Sikkimese resented Campbell for the part he played in Britain’s interference in their country and that night, when Campbell tried to leave the overcrowded hut they had been put in, things turned nasty. Hooker recalled: ‘He had scarcely left when I head him calling loudly to me, “Hooker! Hooker! The savages are murdering me!” I rushed to the door and caught sight of him striking out with his fists, and struggling violently; being tall and powerful, he had already prostrated a few, but, a host of men bore him down, and appeared to be trampling on him; at the same moment I was myself seized by eight men, who forced me back into the hut …’ Campbell was tortured and threatened with execution, and it was only the arrival of a British regiment on Sikkim’s border that secured the release of the two men. Despite its dramatic ending, the expedition was a huge scientific success, and Joseph Hooker would eventually succeed his father as the Director of Kew Gardens. As for Campbell – his legacy is the greatest tea in the world. 
 
Putting the Tea in Britain: The Scots Who Made Our National Drink, by Les Wilson, was published by Birlinn on 3 June. 
 
______________________
 
I’m not related.  Checking the OPR transcriptions, I suspect this might be the family:
 
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Margt

b 28 Mar 1799 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Mary

b 24 Mar 1800 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
John

b 16 Mar 1801 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
Marion

b 20 Apr 1802 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Helen
William

b 16 Dec 1803 Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Nelly Ardmore Arch 30 Apr 1805


Kildalton
Campbell Arch Campbell Nelly Ardmore daug 1 Apr 1806


Kildalton


Re: *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

J LOCHRIDGE
 

Hello Seymour,

Although I have never taken part in this (Except for doing some transcribing for them) I can recommend it for anyone interested in Scottish Family History. The next conference is taking place in July. I am not suggesting this replace what you are proposing, just another resource that some may not be aware of.


https://www.scottishindexes.com/default.aspx


Regards

Johan




------ Original Message ------
From: "Seymour Hosking" <seymourh@...>
To: Islay@Scotland-Genealogy.groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 6 Jun, 21 At 14:12
Subject: [Islay] *** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

On Facebook today I asked if those of us with more experience might help less experienced people, for example on accessing records on the Scottish Records Office site without spending lots of money.
I offered to help organise an online event to talk about ways of searching for records.
[I think one of the problems is that even those of us who have been doing this for years always have new things to learn!]
I'm posting this here because not everyone is on Facebook (as we know well).
I am happy to act as a point of contact for others. My e-mail address should be visible if people want to contact me directly. If you leave a response here, and your e-mail address is not visible then I won't be able to get back to you personally.

regards Seymour



*** SEARCHING FOR FAMILY TREE INFORMATION ***

 

On Facebook today I asked if those of us with more experience might help less experienced people, for example on accessing records on the Scottish Records Office site without spending lots of money.
I offered to help organise an online event to talk about ways of searching for records. 
[I think one of the problems is that even those of us who have been doing this for years always have new things to learn!]
I'm posting this here because not everyone is on Facebook (as we know well).
I am happy to act as a point of contact for others. My e-mail address should be visible if people want to contact me directly. If you leave a response here, and your e-mail address is not visible then I won't be able to get back to you personally.

regards Seymour


Re: [EXT] [Islay] Sinclairs plus Argyll Colony, N.Y.

tsinclair@...
 

Hi John,
In the Daybook of Daniel Campbell it says "The dissatisfaction among the Tacksmen and their families finally resulted in a large emigration of the younger men, their families and sometimes their servants, to New York Colony, organised by Captain Lachlan Campbell of Leorin" (page 21) which the index shows as being in Lower Kildalton parish .  It also says that the "History of the Somonauk Presbyterian Church" has preserved the full sailing lists, plus a number of other documents, which shows what happened to most of the emigrants.  

In the Passenger list of 1739, there is a Duncan McDougall & Janet Calder, his wife, John, Alexander, Ronald, Dugald, and Margaret, his 5 children.  Then (and this is confusing) it adds "Dugald, Gilbert, Flory & Margaret his 3 Children".  I'm not sure whose children these are supposed to be.  Also on this passenger list is an Angus McDougall.

I hope this helps you get back further in your McDougall search into Kildalton parish.  Just looking at the 1749 map of Islay by Stephen MacDougall, surveyor (Coincidence?) it shows Upper Lorin and Lower Lorin in Kaldalton.
Toni S.


Re: [EXT] [Islay] Sinclairs

Malcolm Campbell
 

Hi John

No connection to the Argyle Patent. My people seemed to go directly to Upper Canada. They settled in Thorah, east of Lake Simcoe in the early 1800's

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "John Lynch via groups.io" <javankrona@...>
Date: June 4, 2021 at 9:46 AM

I’ve been pulling at this Argyle Patent thread for some time now, trying to positively establish my McArthur roots. My 2nd great Peter Robert McArthur was born in the Argenteuil region of Montreal about 1858. But I’m stuck there, though I believe he is part of a much larger family group residing in St. Andrew’s and Lachute, Quebec, I believe his father passed young while his wife was pregnant with my 2nd great. This family came out of the Argyle patent, arriving in NY in 1738: Patrick McArthur and Mary McDougall. As the Patent fell into question, this family seems to have settled near Albany, or perhaps Livingston Manor. Patrick’s grand son, Peter b. 1760 settled northward in Jericho, Vermont before settling with his wife Phobe Lane in Argenteuil in 1797. I know that when Phobe passed, she had over 200 direct descendants living in the region.

When Patrick McArthur and Mary McDougall left with Captain Laughlin Campbell for NY, two of Patrick’s brothers were also aboard in 1738. I believe this first group of families was likely well known to Campbell, and perhaps most from the same area of Islay. It’s been very difficult to find much information as regards Lachlan Campbell in Islay, which seems surprising. I did find some information in the Daybook of Daniel Campbell regarding tenancy. It’s been a struggle, have found many histories quite interesting to read of these early settlers from Islay. In two years time, I’ve got plans to stay a considerable time in Montreal and see what I can find in the local libraries.

On Jun 4, 2021, at 8:01 AM, Judith Jeon-Chapman <jjeonchapman@...> wrote:


Malcolm,

I wonder if we are cousins--perhaps very distant cousins. I wonder if your McDougalls immigrated first from the Isle of Islay, like mine, in 1739 to the Argyle Patent, in Argyle, Washington county, New York, USA. Then perhaps they immigrated to Ontario as loyalists, like many people did of that political persuasion.

I descend from Alexander McDougall and Catherine McEachron who left Scotland, from Islay, I believe, but haven't found birth documents there, and who settled in the Argyle Patent in Argyle, New York, USA. They immigrated in 1739 with parents Duncan McDougall (son of Dougal) and Janet Calder, plus siblings. They remained in that area, and were Patriots during the American Revolution.

Records show my McDougalls origine in Argyleshire, Isle of Islay, but I don't know exactly which area of Islay they are from. I would love to find documents. Any suggestions?

Judy Jeon-Chapman

On Thu, Jun 3, 2021 at 11:54 PM Malcolm Campbell < malcolmr.campbell@...> wrote:

Hi Toni

FYI.

My 5th gg was Malcolm SINCLAIR, abt 1740, m. 08 Mar 1785, Kilchrenan and Dalavich, Argyll,Scotland to Mary McINTYRE abt. 1740

Their daughter was

My 4th gg Mary SINCLAIR, 1760 Grastell - 1796, Jura, m. to Alexander McDOUGALL 1760 Grastell - April 24, 1853, Lergybreck.
Parents of Peter “Angus” (King of Egypt) McDOUGALL(1780–1869)
Allan McDOUGALL b. 1781– Grastle


John McDOUGALL b.1783 – Grastell, - d. JUL 1871•Thorah Twp., Beaverton,ON. Tombstone in the Thorah Church Yard with that of his wife, Christina Maiden Name McDOUGALL
Who were the parents of my gg Mary McDOUGALL,
06 NOV 1815•Baolach (?), Kilarrow Parish, - d Marriage 23 MAR 1838•Wesleyan Mission House, Orillia, Simcoe Co. by Rev. J. Scott, per Christian Guardian d. 06 OCT 1896•Nottawasaga Twp., Simcoe County, Ontario, Canada buried in West Church Presbyterian Cemetary

to my Malcolm CURRIE. Guess who I am ultimately named for?

My best,

Malcolm Campbell

 

 


 


Re: [EXT] Re: [EXT] [Islay] Sinclairs

Judith Jeon-Chapman
 

Malcolm,

Thank you for the response and the suggestion.  I will try contacting Toni Sinclair.

Best,

Judy Jeon-Chapman

On Fri, Jun 4, 2021 at 10:37 AM Malcolm Campbell <malcolmr.campbell@...> wrote:

Hi Judith

So far as I know, my McDOUGALLs came from Islay, only to Upper Canada which became Ontario in the 1800's. No mention of coming through New York.

No connection to a Catherine McEACHRON anywhere. 

Toni Sinclair is the best SINCLAIR connection here. She has them married to many from Islay.

I have one direct email for her

"Toni Sinclair" <tonisinclair@...>

beyond this Isaly list.

Good luck,

Malcolm

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